1835 - Book Illustrations: Alexis-François Artaud de Montor

Bogdan

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Found these nice illustrations out of a book published in 1835, by Alexis-François Artaud de Montor.

Dorso.jpg 1_Occhietto.jpg 2_Recto del frontespizio.jpg

This thread might serve as a more convinient resource for those who are just interested in looking at the images/illustrations found in this book, instead of having to flick through over 700 pages by themselves.

The illustrations are very interesting to say the least and depict various places around italy. Almost all of them are titled in french, german and russian.

I am unsure about the age of those illustrations. Although it says published in 1835, I found some of the same illustrations on a stock photo site from another, even older book from around 1784, which depict the exact same pictures with more detail. So keep in mind that those images here could be re-tracings of even older illustrations. I will get to that other book in another thread, because it has multiple volumes. I still haven't found all of them.

I cropped the scans, autoleveled and resharpened them abit. They're as good as it gets, the scan quality from the site is a bit questionable.

I will be emphasizing and commenting some of which I found the most interesting below, and append the rest. They won't fit all in the thread, the rest is going to be in replies. The images are not in order.

Happy scouting!

Here some starters:

Agrigent. Grand Temple.jpg Agrigent. Ruines du Temple de Jupiter Olympien.jpg Agrigent. Temple de la Concorde. Temple de la Concorde.jpg Arc de Trajan à Ancone.jpg Arc du Simplon à Milan.jpg ark_constantin_colosseum_1835.jpg Arpinum.jpg Benevent. Arc de Trajan.jpg Bologne.jpg

Some of the Forum Romanum which isn't labeled "Capriccio" here but can be compared to Giovanni Battista Piranesi's "fantasy" drawings:

forum_septimius_ark_1835.jpg Rome. Colonne de Phocus. Colonne de Phocus_1835. Colonne de Phocus.jpg

Piranesi's Forum Romanum:

Acro_di_Settimo_Severo.jpg Piranesi-forum_small.jpg

Here's why I believe the illustrations in the book are re-traced: The caption of the more detailed version says this:

"Swabian Castle and port, Brindisi, Apulia, Italy, engraving from Voyage pittoresque ou description des royaumes de Naples et de Sicile (Pictoresque voyage or description of the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily), Volume III, by Abbot of Saint-Non (1727-1791), Paris, 1783."

Brindes.jpg Brindisi_Castle_different_engraving_3_original.jpg

Two more engravings of the same place:

Brindisi_Castle_different_engraving_1.jpg Brindisi_Castle_different_engraving_2.jpg

Swabian Castle in Brindisi in real and google:

Brindisi_Castle_now.jpg Brindisi_Castle.jpg Brindisi_Castle_no_streetview.jpg

No google street view there, looks like a military zone.

Cascade de Terni.jpg Casin de Raphael à Rome.jpg Castellamare.jpg Catane.jpg Cathedrale de Milan Interieur de la Cathedrale.jpg Cathedrale de Milan.jpg Chateau de Pavie.jpg Condannation de Jean de Brienne.jpg Costumes dela comédie italienne.jpg Costumes dela comédie italienne_2.jpg Costumes.jpg costumes_1.jpg Doge et Pape.jpg Ecole d'Athenes par Raphael.jpg

Ferrara then and now:

Ferrare.jpg ferrara_now_1.jpg ferrara_now_2.jpg

Florence. Cour du vieux Palais. Cour du vieux Palais.jpg Florence. Dome et Baptistère.jpg Florence. La Loge des Lances. La Loge des Lances.jpg Florence. Palais du Podestà.jpg Florence. Pont de Santissima Trinita.jpg Florence. Santa Croce.jpg Fontaines de Numicius.jpg Gienes.jpg Isola Bella.jpg Isola di Sora.jpg

End of Pt.1...
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Continuing:
Isola di Sora.jpg Italie_figures.jpg Italie_figures_2.jpg Italie_figures_3.jpg Italie_figures_4.jpg Italie_figures_5.jpg Italie_figures_6.jpg Italie_figures_7.jpg Italie_figures_8.jpg Italie_figures_9.jpg Italie_figures_10.jpg Italie_figures_11.jpg

Maps:
Italie_map.jpg Italie_map_2.jpg
Ivrea.jpg Latomies. Oreille de Dionigio.jpg Livourne.jpg Maison de Pétrarque à Argua.jpg Maison du Tasse à Sorrent.jpg Messine. Chapelle souterraine de la Cathédrale.jpg Messine. Vue générale.jpg Moise par Michel Ange.jpg Monaster du Mont Cassin.jpg Naples. Palais du Don Ana.jpg Naples.jpg Palais Tursi Doria.jpg Palerme. Cathédrale.jpg Palerme. Cloitre des Benedictins à Mont Real.jpg Palerme. Vue prise à Mont Real.jpg Pise. Baptisthère, Dome et Tour.jpg Pise. Campo Santo.jpg Place de Arezzo.jpg Place de Livourne.jpg Place Salon à Padoue.jpg Pompei.jpg Pont du Gondo au Simplon.jpg Pont sur le Cantara.jpg

Salerno then:

Salerne.jpg

Can you spot that arch on the shore? That's now totally hidden in an unsuspecting alley:

Porta Nova Salerno.jpg Porta Nova Salerno_2.jpg

Rome. Chateau S. Ange.jpg Rome. Escalier du Capitole.jpg Rome. Maison de Rienzo.jpg Rome. Panthéon. Panthéon.jpg Rome. S. Clément.jpg Rome. S. Jean de Latran. Jean de Latran. Jean de Latran.jpg Rome. S. Jean de Latran.jpg Rome. S. Marie Majeure.jpg

End of Pt.2.
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Now the next one is a rabbit hole in itself. It is titled "Palace of Theodoric" in Terracina. Which Theodoric? Terracina, Palace/Castle of Theodoric (The Great?):

palais_de_theodoric.jpg

Now you can't tell me that the so called "palace" is that tiny little building on that weird rock? I believe the whole rock, including the mountain, was the palace once.

terracina_palace_theodoric.jpg terracina_palace_theodoric_google_2.jpg

Ummmm.... What the actual...?

terracina_palace_theodoric_google_3.jpg

Looks like the italian government doesn't want you to enter that "rock"

terracina_palace_theodoric_google_4.jpg

How many civilisations in that above picture?

terracina_palace_theodoric_google_5.jpg terracina_palace_theodoric_google_6.jpg

I don't know about you, but those look like huge chiseled rocks to me.

terracina_palace_theodoric_google_7.jpg terracina_palace_theodoric_google_8.jpg terracina_palace_theodoric_google_9.jpg terracina_palace_theodoric_google_10.jpg

HUMONGOUS! Great palace for a "great" guy...

Here's the streetview link, so you can check it out yourself. I honestly don't know where the architecture ends and the "natural" rock starts:


Sarcophages.jpg Sculptures de Canova.jpg Sicilie. Chapelle S. Rosalie.jpg Sicilie. Cratère de l'Etna.jpg Sicilie. Fountaine Arethuse.jpg Sicilie. Fountaine Cyane.jpg Sicilie. Temple du Segeste.jpg Sienne. Cathedrale.jpg Sienne. Sacristie de la Cathedrale. Sacristie de la Cathedrale.jpg

This next one is probably the wildest. Who are those stairs for? Sicilia is a topic on its own:

Souterrain des Epipoles.jpg

The hand.... aaaaaand it's gone!

Souterrain des Epipoles_zoom.jpg
Syracuse. Maison de Campagne de Timoléon.jpg Syracuse. Temple de Minerve.jpg Syracuse. Temple de Minerve_Temple de Minerve.jpg Syracuse. Théatre.jpg Temples de Pestum.jpg Termini.jpg Terni.jpg Théatre de Taormine.jpg Tivoli. Grotte de Neptuno. Grotte de Neptuno.jpg Tombeau de Dante à Ravenne.jpg Tourner.jpg

Transport du Clocher Notre Dame du Palais pour Crescentino.jpg

Ehhhhm what? Church on rails again... I mean logs.
Trente.jpg Turin.jpg Vallombrosa.jpg venice.jpg Venise. Interieur de S. Marc. Marc.jpg Venise. Le Rialto.jpg Venise. Place et Eglise de S. Marc.jpg Verone.jpg Vicence.jpg Villa Medici.jpg Vue de Gienes.jpg Vue de Gienes_2.jpg Vue du Vesuve.jpg Vue à Taormine.jpg Taormina.jpg

The End.

Hope you enjoyed! ;)
Post automatically merged:

Almost forgot: Here's the original book.
 

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Silveryou

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Those Theodoric ruins, they are not advertised anywhere either in Italy. Our mafia-masonic government is certainly a partner in crime.
For the true historical Theodoric, please look here:
Legends about Theodoric the Great - Wikipedia
Þiðrekssaga - Wikipedia

Without the name associated to it and with a conscious mind, I think these ruins could be labeled as Etruscan (not the people who lives in Tuscany, probably).
 

codis

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Ehhhhm what? Church on rails again... I mean logs.
I have seen such things in Germany, some years ago.
Larger building that were deemed worth preserving were moved that way, when the land was surface mined.
East Germany, being not really wealthy, wacked a lot of cities and villages for brown coal, the only abundant domestic energy source.
The building was trenched up, AFAIK railway tracks laid (more than one in parallel), and the carriage stepwise mounted under the building.
Then it was slowly pulled away, with a speed of some feet per hour.

But the common residents were usually compensated (expelled and their 'unworthy' homes wacked).
 

Silveryou

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Those Theodoric ruins, they are not advertised anywhere either in Italy. Our mafia-masonic government is certainly a partner in crime.
For the true historical Theodoric, please look here:
Legends about Theodoric the Great - Wikipedia
Þiðrekssaga - Wikipedia

Without the name associated to it and with a conscious mind, I think these ruins could be labeled as Etruscan (not the people who lives in Tuscany, probably).
palais_de_theodoric.jpg

This is a perfect example on the destruction and reconstruction of history perpetrated by italian nationalism. What was once the Palace of Theodoric the Great now has no name. They have a name for the promontory behind the ruins of the palace, the Pisco Montano, a little mountain, and nothing more. It is said on the wiki that the palace was in reality the temple of Giove Anxur (Tempio di Giove Anxur - Wikipedia) on the Pisco Montano, so famous with its 2000 years of history that there is not even an english wiki for this construction! It was surely not the authentic palace, in fact in all the images above the subject is always represented at the centre, obviously, while this temple is on the far left, with the authentic palace of Theodoric at the centre.

All the informations about the construction of the Appian Way on the italian wiki for the city of Terracina are copied from the english page which takes the informations from the Encyclopedia Britannica (1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Terracina - Wikisource, the free online library). It is said on the Encyclopedia that
  • The construction of the Via Appia in 312 B.C. added to its importance: the road at first crossed the hill at the back of the promontory by a steep ascent and descent. An attempt was made in 184 B.C. to get round it by an embankment thrown out into the sea: but it was probably not until early in the imperial period that a cutting in the rocks at the foot of the promontory (Pisco Montano) finally solved the problem. The depth of the cutting is indicated by marks on the vertical wall at intervals of 10 Roman ft.—figures enclosed in large swallow-tail tablets—the lowest mark, 3 or 4 ft. above the present road, is CXX.
As you can see the road was re-adapted to pass in front of the palace. Historians don't know exactly when it was reshaped and they speculate it was done during Trajan's time. The italian wiki states shamelessly this hypotesis as fact.
I think the road was "moved" during the time of Theodoric to give access to his palace.
 

Silveryou

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Looking at Piranesi's engraving "Antiquus Circi Martial. Cum Monum. Adiacentia Prospectus Ad Viam Appiam" in this thread (Ancient Rome according to Piranesi and others), I've noticed a similarity in the relative disposition of the presumed (by me:)) Palace of Domitian with the presumed (by me:LOL:) Domus Aurea. But now also the Palace of Theodoric in relation to the cliff behind it takes on a new meaning. Are we dealing with a recurrent pattern?

imaginary view showing examples of ancient Roman decorative styles - Copia.jpg
64288_terracina_montegiove.jpg
 
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