Famous Falsified Musicians: Ludwig Van Beethoven

luddite

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I would like to present to you the enigmatic and astoundingly deaf bachelor, Ludwig Van Beethoven. The man, the myth and well... mainly the myth.

583489_poster_l.jpg

He began composing at 7 (similar to Mozart's 6: SH Archive - Music | - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - anything strange there?) however even this is disputed as being too old in some circles.

Thirteen-year-old_Beethoven.jpg

At 14 he was appointed as the organist to the Choir of Maximilian Franz. I believe the age because I once saw Silverchair perform live when they were 14yo's playing 3, and sometimes 4, chord grunge songs.

Silverchair were an Australian rock band, which formed in 1992. Silverchair have sold over six million albums worldwide
ludwig-van-beethoven-4.jpg

Even so, there is no disputing that when he first began to get sick and deaf he was still pumping out the music with a bravado that is rarely, if ever heard of. In fact, during his sickness it is as if he wern't both deaf and sick as the quality, variance and complexity of his works amplified.

Putting this aside, he had a relatively easy life. Multiple on-going lawsuits, family deaths, family fights, family attempted suicides, complete failure to obtain a wife (even though he was the most famous composer in Vienna) and money problems due to inconsistent working arrangements. None, of these minor issues held him back, nor would they as he was a genius.

At 24 (1795), he had finished his studies with Haydn (left) and Albrechtsberger (right).

Hadyn.jpg Johann_Georg_Albrechtsberger.jpg

In the year of 1795 that he finished his studies he was at his most prolific. He composed 146 piano, violin, vocal, orchestral and symphonic pieces in this uneventful year of study, final exams, his first famous performances, intense courting and the subsequent denied marriage proposal to the semi-famous touring singer Magdalena Willmann. As if that wasn't enough, his old teacher, Haydn, visited LVB from London and finally his brother Carl visited him.

Amid the compositions that he released this year were the famed Trios for Piano (opus 1). An average of one piece every 2.5 days. Not a shabby effort at all.

There are many web pages spewing factoids about when our deaf mastermind actually went deaf but for the purpose of this thread I will go with the the year 1797 as detailed Chronology of Beethoven's life - Ludwig van Beethoven's website.

This puts him at the tender age of 26. You can of course find that this number varies due to his desire to keep his deafness a deep dark secret. Alas, being deaf is not the kind of thing that one can keep secret for very long, especially when you are the renowned musician Ludwig Van Beethoven (LVB) who is performing in front of paying students, packed church gatherings and large orchestral settings.

At 26, he had already composed a handful of songs. 433 to be exact. These works range from singular piano/violin pieces, duo's, trio's, chamber(4 instruments), septets, vocal arrangements over chamber music , orchestral and symphonies (in excess of 30 of these). Each piece contained at minimum three parts: intro, middle and end. Many of them have non repeating melody lines in them that evolve as the piece progresses.

A surprising thing to note is that in the late 1700's, LVB didn't have access to a computer to copy/paste melody lines or to undo mistakes. Instead he used paper and ink. The paper and ink was of such high quality that it lasted nearly 250 years until now and is still perfectly legible and thus open to melodic interpretation. If he made a mistake he would have to start again.


Beethoven by the numbers
Some stats to ponder. Please note that I massively underestimate the parts and melodies and most likely the instruments sections and variations but I would have to spend more precious time on the calculations to determine that one. It is thus better to undershoot than exaggerate. So, the numbers you are about to see are lower than the actual, so you will have to use your imagination to project.

First you should know what we are dealing with. Our bard wrote a lot of songs. 1285 to be as exact as one could be. Forgeries, variations and lost works could be argued to lower or raise this number but in the general way of our times, this is the number I calculated. The spreadsheet is linked below so you can see my methodology.

Here is a graph I complied from a thorough list of all his works and mapped them to the accepted year of completion and finally I graphed them.

SongsPerAge.JPG

Below is an example of 2 pages (p212 and p253) from his 263 page manuscript for the Orchestral Symphony, Opus.60, 1806. He had 84 of these orchestral symphonies and a further 54 slightly smaller, usually by a few pages, stage productions, operas, plays etc. You can see his attempt to scribble out a mistake or two. He really should have invented an eraser as it would have been easier than being paranoid writing out the 794,130 pages of manuscripts over his career. Yes, you did read that right. LVB, at a low estimate would have had to have scribed nearly eight hundred thousand pages of sheet music in his life time.


An Orchestral piece averages more at 270 plus pages. There are more than 10,000 individual melodies across all instruments and this is just a standard example.

I mapped it out and again I took the low ball on this.

SongsAverage PagesMedley's Per Sheet Music PageInstruments
Vocal57412165
Chamber37226165
Keyboard962822
Orchestral8427016100
Stage522601670
Keyboard/Vocal4616162
Uncategorised06164
Total128579413012706080
Year35.6944444422059.16667352946.6667
Day0.09779299860.43607306966.9771689

So, every day for 36 years LVB wrote, on average and at minimum, 60 pages of musical notation and 966 melodies. Illuminati confirmed. 3, 6 and 9! This doesn't include his recently found lost manuscripts...which I discount as 100% false although they may hint at what other musicians contributed...

Now I would like to say a few points here.

1. Total songs came out at 1285 which includes variations of compositions. If not included, the number is about 100 less but I chose to include them because his variations vary so much that they would have required much effort.

2. I target his deaf age to highlight how amazing this deaf guy was. Many of his pieces have such complex interplay of vocals, instruments and movements that many orchestras require weeks to perfect a single piece.

Pre deafness < 26Post Deafness > 26
433852
33.69%66.30%

3. Over his productive working lifetime of 36 good years before his untimely death at 56, he averaged 35.69 pieces per year.

lithograph_of_beethoven_on_his_deathbed_by_josef_danhauser.jpg

4. He was a huge lover of Irish, Scottish, Welsh and British music. He was such a big lover that 10% of all pieces and variations were in this category. He didn't just take an old poem(although he did do that on many occasions), he created standard formats and interpretations of such songs as St Patrick's Day, God Save the King and Rule Britannia. The last two had 5 and 7 variations respectively. He LOVED this style even more than any other single style or nationality (including his native Country it seems). Come to think about it, he kind of looks Irish... in a mad hatter kind of way.

mad-hatter.jpg



Some of his 'most loved' songs grouped by his release dates.

37 Scottish songs over 2 volumes 1815-19 (45-49yo)
O! Thou Art the Lad of my Heart​
Sympathy ("Why, Julia, say, that pensive mien?")​
Bonnie Laddie, Highland Laddie ("Where got ye that siller moon")​
Dim, Dim is my Eye​
The Sweetest Lad was Jamie​
Again, my Lyre​
O Swiftly Glides the Bonny Boat​
Could This Ill World Have Been Contriv'd​
O Cruel Was My Father​
O, How Can I Be Blithe and Glad​
O, Had My Fate Been Join'd With Thine​
The Lovely Lass of Inverness​
O Mary, at Thy Window Be​
Come Fill, Fill, my Good fellow!​
Behold my Love how Green the Groves​
The Maid of Isla ("O maid of Isla from yon cliff")​
O Sweet were the Hours​
Music, Love and Wine ("O let me music hear, night and day!")​
Sally in Our Alley ("Of all the girls that are so smart")​
The Highland Watch ("Old Scotia, wake thy mountain strain")​
Jeanie's Distress ("By William late offended")​

57 Irish songs over 3 volumes 1810-12 (40-42yo)
Including​
Air Tirolien: “I bin a Tiroler Bua”​
Air Écossais: “Bonny Laddie, Highland Laddie”​
Air de la petite Russie, also known as Volkslied aus Kleinrussland​
Air Écossais: “The Pulse of an Irishman” or “St. Patrick’s Day”​
Air Rirolien: “A Madel, ja a Madel”​
Air Écossais: “Merch Megan” or “Peggy’s Daughter”​
Air Russe: “Schöne Minka”​
Air Écossais: “O Mary, at thy Window Be”​
Air Écossais: “Oh, Thou art the Lad of my Heart”​
Air Écossais: “The Highland Watch”​

26 Welsh songs over 1810-15 (40-45yo)

9 British plus "Rule Britannia" (7 variations), "God Save the King" (5 variations) 1803-17 (32-47yo)

Total: 129 Songs from Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Britain.


Conclusion

So, every day for 36 years LVB wrote, on average and at minimum, 60 pages of musical notation and 966 melodies.
The above data shows that this is a complete impossibility considering the high quality and variance of the works.

As one of my favorite classical composers, my favorite is Bela Bartok, I was saddened to come to the following obvious conclusion but sorry Ludwig my old friend, you are nothing more than a catchall for many other musicians from a previous time. A collection of musicians works, all clustered into one potentially real composer discography. What did he write exactly? We may never know but I for one am still going to listen to him but with different ears.

Statistics and Sources
Stats were calculated from data found List of compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven - Wikipedia (yes, yes I know it's wikipedia but they were the only source that was able to be neatly copied into a spreadsheet. I did compare with other sites and it appeared to be a consensus.
See my spreadsheet in read-only mode. It's a bit of a mess... Beethoven Data on CryptPad
I first came across this topic of LVB on a Facebook group run a good researcher "Marcia Ramalho". He said the following which kicked me off down a two day rabbit hole.
Before anyone asks me, I answer yes. I think Beethoven never existed either. His work belongs to unknown artists from a destroyed civilization whose remains are scattered on the streets and deserts of the whole world.
Even Beethoven's name is false, looking like the mere joining of two words, bee and oven.
Side note: It took nearly two days to put all of this together and there are potentially minor mistakes but with such a lot of data the same conclusion would still be reached (I hope).


beethovengrave.jpg


RIP my bonny lad of many men!
 

Lightseeker

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Forum sliding, thread derailing and inappropriate behaviour
The fact that you use the word song to refer to what is actually called a piece, undermines the credibility of your post.
 

Kike

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The fact that you use the word song to refer to what is actually called a piece, undermines the credibility of your post.
The fact that you use the word song to refer to what is actually called a piece, undermines the credibility of your post.
What? You havent made any contributing threads, atleast he is doing good research and post his theories.
 

msw141

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learning about the Shakespeare Authorship Question really opened my eyes to how something that can't pass mild scrutiny manages to persist unnoticed for ages simply because nobody questions what they're told.
 

Ponygirl

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I would like to present to you the enigmatic and astoundingly deaf bachelor, Ludwig Van Beethoven. The man, the myth and well... mainly the myth.


He began composing at 7 (similar to Mozart's 6: SH Archive - Music | - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - anything strange there?) however even this is disputed as being too old in some circles.


At 14 he was appointed as the organist to the Choir of Maximilian Franz. I believe the age because I once saw Silverchair perform live when they were 14yo's playing 3, and sometimes 4, chord grunge songs.

Silverchair were an Australian rock band, which formed in 1992. Silverchair have sold over six million albums worldwide

Even so, there is no disputing that when he first began to get sick and deaf he was still pumping out the music with a bravado that is rarely, if ever heard of. In fact, during his sickness it is as if he wern't both deaf and sick as the quality, variance and complexity of his works amplified.

Putting this aside, he had a relatively easy life. Multiple on-going lawsuits, family deaths, family fights, family attempted suicides, complete failure to obtain a wife (even though he was the most famous composer in Vienna) and money problems due to inconsistent working arrangements. None, of these minor issues held him back, nor would they as he was a genius.

At 24 (1795), he had finished his studies with Haydn (left) and Albrechtsberger (right).


In the year of 1795 that he finished his studies he was at his most prolific. He composed 146 piano, violin, vocal, orchestral and symphonic pieces in this uneventful year of study, final exams, his first famous performances, intense courting and the subsequent denied marriage proposal to the semi-famous touring singer Magdalena Willmann. As if that wasn't enough, his old teacher, Haydn, visited LVB from London and finally his brother Carl visited him.

Amid the compositions that he released this year were the famed Trios for Piano (opus 1). An average of one piece every 2.5 days. Not a shabby effort at all.

There are many web pages spewing factoids about when our deaf mastermind actually went deaf but for the purpose of this thread I will go with the the year 1797 as detailed Chronology of Beethoven's life - Ludwig van Beethoven's website.

This puts him at the tender age of 26. You can of course find that this number varies due to his desire to keep his deafness a deep dark secret. Alas, being deaf is not the kind of thing that one can keep secret for very long, especially when you are the renowned musician Ludwig Van Beethoven (LVB) who is performing in front of paying students, packed church gatherings and large orchestral settings.

At 26, he had already composed a handful of songs. 433 to be exact. These works range from singular piano/violin pieces, duo's, trio's, chamber(4 instruments), septets, vocal arrangements over chamber music , orchestral and symphonies (in excess of 30 of these). Each piece contained at minimum three parts: intro, middle and end. Many of them have non repeating melody lines in them that evolve as the piece progresses.

A surprising thing to note is that in the late 1700's, LVB didn't have access to a computer to copy/paste melody lines or to undo mistakes. Instead he used paper and ink. The paper and ink was of such high quality that it lasted nearly 250 years until now and is still perfectly legible and thus open to melodic interpretation. If he made a mistake he would have to start again.


Beethoven by the numbers
Some stats to ponder. Please note that I massively underestimate the parts and melodies and most likely the instruments sections and variations but I would have to spend more precious time on the calculations to determine that one. It is thus better to undershoot than exaggerate. So, the numbers you are about to see are lower than the actual, so you will have to use your imagination to project.

First you should know what we are dealing with. Our bard wrote a lot of songs. 1285 to be as exact as one could be. Forgeries, variations and lost works could be argued to lower or raise this number but in the general way of our times, this is the number I calculated. The spreadsheet is linked below so you can see my methodology.

Here is a graph I complied from a thorough list of all his works and mapped them to the accepted year of completion and finally I graphed them.


Below is an example of 2 pages (p212 and p253) from his 263 page manuscript for the Orchestral Symphony, Opus.60, 1806. He had 84 of these orchestral symphonies and a further 54 slightly smaller, usually by a few pages, stage productions, operas, plays etc. You can see his attempt to scribble out a mistake or two. He really should have invented an eraser as it would have been easier than being paranoid writing out the 794,130 pages of manuscripts over his career. Yes, you did read that right. LVB, at a low estimate would have had to have scribed nearly eight hundred thousand pages of sheet music in his life time.


An Orchestral piece averages more at 270 plus pages. There are more than 10,000 individual melodies across all instruments and this is just a standard example.

I mapped it out and again I took the low ball on this.

SongsAverage PagesMedley's Per Sheet Music PageInstruments
Vocal57412165
Chamber37226165
Keyboard962822
Orchestral8427016100
Stage522601670
Keyboard/Vocal4616162
Uncategorised06164
Total128579413012706080
Year35.6944444422059.16667352946.6667
Day0.09779299860.43607306966.9771689

So, every day for 36 years LVB wrote, on average and at minimum, 60 pages of musical notation and 966 melodies. Illuminati confirmed. 3, 6 and 9! This doesn't include his recently found lost manuscripts...which I discount as 100% false although they may hint at what other musicians contributed...

Now I would like to say a few points here.

1. Total songs came out at 1285 which includes variations of compositions. If not included, the number is about 100 less but I chose to include them because his variations vary so much that they would have required much effort.

2. I target his deaf age to highlight how amazing this deaf guy was. Many of his pieces have such complex interplay of vocals, instruments and movements that many orchestras require weeks to perfect a single piece.

Pre deafness < 26Post Deafness > 26
433852
33.69%66.30%

3. Over his productive working lifetime of 36 good years before his untimely death at 56, he averaged 35.69 pieces per year.


4. He was a huge lover of Irish, Scottish, Welsh and British music. He was such a big lover that 10% of all pieces and variations were in this category. He didn't just take an old poem(although he did do that on many occasions), he created standard formats and interpretations of such songs as St Patrick's Day, God Save the King and Rule Britannia. The last two had 5 and 7 variations respectively. He LOVED this style even more than any other single style or nationality (including his native Country it seems). Come to think about it, he kind of looks Irish... in a mad hatter kind of way.




Some of his 'most loved' songs grouped by his release dates.

37 Scottish songs over 2 volumes 1815-19 (45-49yo)
O! Thou Art the Lad of my Heart​
Sympathy ("Why, Julia, say, that pensive mien?")​
Bonnie Laddie, Highland Laddie ("Where got ye that siller moon")​
Dim, Dim is my Eye​
The Sweetest Lad was Jamie​
Again, my Lyre​
O Swiftly Glides the Bonny Boat​
Could This Ill World Have Been Contriv'd​
O Cruel Was My Father​
O, How Can I Be Blithe and Glad​
O, Had My Fate Been Join'd With Thine​
The Lovely Lass of Inverness​
O Mary, at Thy Window Be​
Come Fill, Fill, my Good fellow!​
Behold my Love how Green the Groves​
The Maid of Isla ("O maid of Isla from yon cliff")​
O Sweet were the Hours​
Music, Love and Wine ("O let me music hear, night and day!")​
Sally in Our Alley ("Of all the girls that are so smart")​
The Highland Watch ("Old Scotia, wake thy mountain strain")​
Jeanie's Distress ("By William late offended")​

57 Irish songs over 3 volumes 1810-12 (40-42yo)
Including​
Air Tirolien: “I bin a Tiroler Bua”​
Air Écossais: “Bonny Laddie, Highland Laddie”​
Air de la petite Russie, also known as Volkslied aus Kleinrussland​
Air Écossais: “The Pulse of an Irishman” or “St. Patrick’s Day”​
Air Rirolien: “A Madel, ja a Madel”​
Air Écossais: “Merch Megan” or “Peggy’s Daughter”​
Air Russe: “Schöne Minka”​
Air Écossais: “O Mary, at thy Window Be”​
Air Écossais: “Oh, Thou art the Lad of my Heart”​
Air Écossais: “The Highland Watch”​

26 Welsh songs over 1810-15 (40-45yo)

9 British plus "Rule Britannia" (7 variations), "God Save the King" (5 variations) 1803-17 (32-47yo)

Total: 129 Songs from Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Britain.


Conclusion

So, every day for 36 years LVB wrote, on average and at minimum, 60 pages of musical notation and 966 melodies.
The above data shows that this is a complete impossibility considering the high quality and variance of the works.

As one of my favorite classical composers, my favorite is Bela Bartok, I was saddened to come to the following obvious conclusion but sorry Ludwig my old friend, you are nothing more than a catchall for many other musicians from a previous time. A collection of musicians works, all clustered into one potentially real composer discography. What did he write exactly? We may never know but I for one am still going to listen to him but with different ears.

Statistics and Sources
Stats were calculated from data found List of compositions by Ludwig van Beethoven - Wikipedia (yes, yes I know it's wikipedia but they were the only source that was able to be neatly copied into a spreadsheet. I did compare with other sites and it appeared to be a consensus.
See my spreadsheet in read-only mode. It's a bit of a mess... Beethoven Data on CryptPad
I first came across this topic of LVB on a Facebook group run a good researcher "Marcia Ramalho". He said the following which kicked me off down a two day rabbit hole.
Before anyone asks me, I answer yes. I think Beethoven never existed either. His work belongs to unknown artists from a destroyed civilization whose remains are scattered on the streets and deserts of the whole world.
Even Beethoven's name is false, looking like the mere joining of two words, bee and oven.
Side note: It took nearly two days to put all of this together and there are potentially minor mistakes but with such a lot of data the same conclusion would still be reached (I hope).


View attachment 7729

RIP my bonny lad of many men!
Great research and as a musician I totally agree with both the ridiculous output, and doing while deaf. It would be like a blind painter. You can be a blind musician, or a deaf painter, but I seriously have my doubts as whether you switch them up. Sounds more like someone is trying to cram centuries of music into one era to keep us from knowing our glorious past. Nothing quite as wonderful has been written after the 1600s because the war killed off the people who wrote them.
 

MgvdT

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All fine and dandy, but what do the Dutch have to say about this?

-His grandfather Louis (Ludwig) van Beethoven was a kappelmeister and little Ludwig (LvB) adored him so much, that even when he passed away at 3 years of age, he always carried this image of his grandfather with him

Louis.jpg


-His grandfather may have been adored by little Ludwig, his father Johann surely was not; Johann was a drinker and tried to make little Ludwig get big, sometimes by waking him up in the middle of the night after a visit to a local pub, to practice.

-In 1792 our protagonist is a beloved guest at many of the nobilties in Vienna. He wears the latest fashion, visits barbers regularly and even takes dancing lessons, but the master lacks rhythm and fails to impress.
-Because he grew deaf, he got depressed. And on 6 october 1802 he wrote the Heiligenstädter Testament.

Beethoven1.jpg

Beethoven 2.jpg


Beethoven 3.jpg

For my brothers Carl and Beethoven
O ye men who think or say that I am malevolent, stubborn or misanthropic, how greatly do ye wrong me, you do not know the secret causes of my seeming, from childhood my heart and mind were disposed to the gentle feelings of good will, I was even ever eager to accomplish great deeds, but reflect now that for six years I have been a hopeless case, aggravated by senseless physicians, cheated year after year in the hope of improvement, finally compelled to face the prospect of a lasting malady (whose cure will take years or, perhaps, be impossible), born with an ardent and lively temperament, even susceptible to the diversions of society, I was compelled early to isolate myself, to live in loneliness, when I at times tried to forget all this, O how harshly was I repulsed by the doubly sad experience of my bad hearing, and yet it was impossible for me to say to men speak louder, shout, for I am deaf. Ah how could I possibly admit such an infirmity in the one sense which should have been more perfect in me than in others, a sense which I once possessed in highest perfection, a perfection such as few surely in my profession enjoy or have enjoyed - O I cannot do it, therefore forgive me when you see me draw back when I would gladly mingle with you, my misfortune is doubly painful because it must lead to my being misunderstood, for me there can be no recreations in society of my fellows, refined intercourse, mutual exchange of thought, only just as little as the greatest needs command may I mix with society. I must live like an exile, if I approach near to people a hot terror seizes upon me, a fear that I may be subjected to the danger of letting my condition be observed - thus it has been during the past year which I spent in the country, commanded by my intelligent physician to spare my hearing as much as possible, in this almost meeting my natural disposition, although I sometimes ran counter to it yielding to my inclination for society, but what a humiliation when one stood beside me and heard a flute in the distance and I heard nothing, or someone heard the shepherd singing and again I heard nothing, such incidents brought me to the verge of despair, but little more and I would have put an end to my life - only art it was that withheld me, ah it seemed impossible to leave the world until I had produced all that I felt called upon me to produce, and so I endured this wretched existence - truly wretched, an excitable body which a sudden change can throw from the best into the worst state - Patience - it is said that I must now choose for my guide, I have done so, I hope my determination will remain firm to endure until it please the inexorable parcae to bread the thread, perhaps I shall get better, perhaps not, I am prepared. Forced already in my 28th year to become a philosopher, O it is not easy, less easy for the artist than for anyone else - Divine One thou lookest into my inmost soul, thou knowest it, thou knowest that love of man and desire to do good live therein. O men, when some day you read these words, reflect that ye did me wrong and let the unfortunate one comfort himself and find one of his kind who despite all obstacles of nature yet did all that was in his power to be accepted among worthy artists and men. You my brothers Carl and [Johann] as soon as I am dead if Dr. Schmid is still alive ask him in my name to describe my malady and attach this document to the history of my illness so that so far as possible at least the world may become reconciled with me after my death. At the same time I declare you two to be the heirs to my small fortune (if so it can be called), divide it fairly, bear with and help each other, what injury you have done me you know was long ago forgiven. to you brother Carl I give special thanks for the attachment you have displayed towards me of late. It is my wish that your lives be better and freer from care than I have had, recommend virtue to your children, it alone can give happiness, not money, I speak from experience, it was virtue that upheld me in misery, to it next to my art I owe the fact that I did not end my life with suicide. - Farewell and love each other - I thank all my friends, particularly Prince Lichnowsky and Professor Schmid - I desire that the instruments from Prince L. be preserved by one of you but let no quarrel result from this, so soon as they can serve you better purpose sell them, how glad will I be if I can still be helpful to you in my grave - with joy I hasten towards death - if it comes before I shall have had an opportunity to show all my artistic capacities it will still come too early for me despite my hard fate and I shall probably wish it had come later - but even then I am satisfied, will it not free me from my state of endless suffering? Come when thou will I shall meet thee bravely. - Farewell and do not wholly forget me when I am dead, I deserve this of you in having often in life thought of you how to make you happy, be so -*
Heiglnstadt
october 6,1802
Ludwig van Beethoven

Beethoven 4.jpg

Heiligenstadt, October 10, 1802, thus do I take my farewell of thee - and indeed sadly - yes that beloved hope - which I brought with me when I came here to be cured at least in a degree - I must wholly abandon, as the leaves of autumn fall and are withered so hope has been blighted, almost as I came - I go away - even the high courage - which often inspired me in the beautiful days of summer - has disappeared - O Providence - grant me at least but on e day of pure joy - it is so long since real joy echoed in my heart - O when - O when, O Divine One - shall I find it again in the temple of nature and of men - Never? no - O that would be too hard.*




-In Februari 1809, Rudolph von Habsburg offers Ludwig a big boy contract worth 4000 fl a year. One of the conditions is that he stays in Habsburg territory, and he accepts. In May, when the French lay siege to the city, our not-as-deaf-as-we-imagined-protagonist hides in his brothers basement, and covers his ears with pillows, as he cannot bare the sound of canonfire.

-We write May 1810 down as the month when Ludwig requested his baptismal certificate. Our hero wants to impress a certain Thérèse Malfatti, for whom he writes the famous ''für Elise''. Except he doesn't, because he writes "Für Thérèse". However, because of his awful handwriting everybody read it wrong.
Also Beethoven is unhappy, because he thinks he received the wrong baptismal certificate (he believes he received his brother's Ludwig Maria van Beethoven's. Not his own. (This because he believes he is born in 1772)

-Initially, Beethoven's Eroïca was written for Napoleon in 1803. However, when the later declared himself emperor a year later, Ludwig was so upset that he scratched his name of the original, leaving a hole.
Eroica Beethoven.jpg


*As provided by Lvbeethoven.com

Sorry for the long post and any spelling mistakes, thank you for reading an have a great day!
M
 
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luddite

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learning about the Shakespeare Authorship Question really opened my eyes to how something that can't pass mild scrutiny manages to persist unnoticed for ages simply because nobody questions what they're told.
It's beginning to appear that way but once you see it you can't un-see it!

Great research and as a musician I totally agree with both the ridiculous output, and doing while deaf. It would be like a blind painter. You can be a blind musician, or a deaf painter, but I seriously have my doubts as whether you switch them up. Sounds more like someone is trying to cram centuries of music into one era to keep us from knowing our glorious past. Nothing quite as wonderful has been written after the 1600s because the war killed off the people who wrote them.
Yes, it is ridiculous! I'm a musician also and although I've written close to 1,500 songs they are each able to be written on a single piece of paper of chords and lyrics. They are also generally very simple songs so please don't think I'm comparing my quality/complexity to a great composer but I am more making the point that volume vs quality is generally the rule.

His grandfather Louis (Ludwig) van Beethoven was a kappelmeister and little Ludwig (LvB) adored him so much, that even when he passed away at 3 years of age, he always carried this image of his grandfather with him
I ignored this bit of LVB because it was simply just too stupid. Some history mention that the grandfather taught him how to play so that brings into question the age of his death.

his father Johann surely was not; Johann was a drinker and tried to make little Ludwig get big, sometimes by waking him up in the middle of the night after a visit to a local pub, to practice.
Again, the father trope is a tired one but set's our protagonist off on a journey coming from a difficult place of struggle. What story can be good without that?

-In 1792 our protagonist is a beloved guest at many of the nobilties in Vienna. He wears the latest fashion, visits barbers regularly and even takes dancing lessons, but the master lacks rhythm and fails to impress.
-Because he grew deaf, he got depressed. And on 6 october 1802 he wrote the Heiligenstädter Testament.
I steered clear of criticisms of him because there is no "him". They are not easy to find but they are there.

Our hero wants to impress a certain Thérèse Malfatti, for whom he writes the famous ''für Elise''. Except he doesn't, because he writes "Für Thérèse". However, because of his awful handwriting everybody read it wrong.
hahah I didn't find that tidbit. His handwriting is that of a inmate at an insane asylum. It was one of the reasons that first hooked me into this as I couldn't believe such horrible penmenship could accompany one so great...

@MgvdT - could you please translate the Heiligenstädter Testament.as the Dutch text isn't very helpful here....
 

Oracle

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I too am amazed at how easily we have been duped by so many things over the years by the abuse of our trust and lack of scrutiny.
I don't trust anything I see or hear anymore, everything gets scrutinized. Such a shame the way our basic natural trust that we're being told truth has been taken for gullibility and abused.
As for Beethoven, putting the stats together like you did was an awesome way to spotlight this fraud. Great work!
 

luddite

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As for Beethoven, putting the stats together like you did was an awesome way to spotlight this fraud. Great work!

Thanks Oracle. I listen to about 6 hours of classical per day whilst I'm working and it was really something that slapped me awake. I'm am eying off my favorite composer, Bela Bartok... he wouldn't be fake also? 25 March 1881 – 26 September 1945 ...oh no... he lived through the reset and was at his most productive then and died in the mess of WW2. None of that bodes well for him.
 

matematik

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He was a huge lover of Irish, Scottish, Welsh and British music.
But definitely not English music.
Do you mean music from England? That's British.

or do you mean music with English singing? I think he definitely did.
Technically English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish are all British, not just English. Although I know abroad "British" and "English" seem to be used as synonyms, I'm just being pedantic.
 

luddite

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He was a huge lover of Irish, Scottish, Welsh and British music.
But definitely not English music.
Do you mean music from England? That's British.

or do you mean music with English singing? I think he definitely did.
Technically English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish are all British, not just English. Although I know abroad "British" and "English" seem to be used as synonyms, I'm just being pedantic.
I agree.
English and British are not the same.
Let's not get in a geography and linguistics argument and stay on topic please!
 

momentomori

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Great post, LVB truly had that protestant work ethic! 800k pages? With all that scribbling when did he find time to play piano? The output of the big three was superhuman. Mozart wrote 47 symphonies! Andras Schiff mentions that it would take several decades of full time work to just copy Bach's work by hand. Yet, every one a masterpiece! While many people, like Schiff, spend a lifetime to master just performing one small part of this work. Let alone the time it must take to just conceive of such things like or LBV 9th or something like the art of fugue (Bach's 1080th work, over an hour of music, many many pages).

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SclAUqaj2Q


Please, if anyone has looked into Bach let me know as I haven't seen it. Supposedly he was completely forgotten until Mendelssohn "revived" him in 1829. I have spent a fair amount of time studying his music and all I can say for sure is that the works attributed to him are undoubtedly works of high musical genius. And imagine it on those big organs!

The fact that you use the word song to refer to what is actually called a piece, undermines the credibility of your post.

With respect luddite, and at the risk of getting involved in drama on my first post, I have to say in defense of Lightseeker that I found this terminology a bit confusing at first, though i quickly understood your meaning. I think because parts of the post refer to pieces that would fit the technical classical definition of "songs" as songs, and then all pieces generally, as songs. And, as one is reading an essay on classical music the former is assumed. Classical types never tire of pointing this out so you will get this a lot for sure.
 

luddite

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Great post, LVB truly had that protestant work ethic! 800k pages? With all that scribbling when did he find time to play piano? The output of the big three was superhuman. Mozart wrote 47 symphonies! Andras Schiff mentions that it would take several decades of full time work to just copy Bach's work by hand. Yet, every one a masterpiece! While many people, like Schiff, spend a lifetime to master just performing one small part of this work. Let alone the time it must take to just conceive of such things like or LBV 9th or something like the art of fugue (Bach's 1080th work, over an hour of music, many many pages).

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SclAUqaj2Q


Please, if anyone has looked into Bach let me know as I haven't seen it. Supposedly he was completely forgotten until Mendelssohn "revived" him in 1829. I have spent a fair amount of time studying his music and all I can say for sure is that the works attributed to him are undoubtedly works of high musical genius. And imagine it on those big organs!

The fact that you use the word song to refer to what is actually called a piece, undermines the credibility of your post.

With respect luddite, and at the risk of getting involved in drama on my first post, I have to say in defense of Lightseeker that I found this terminology a bit confusing at first, though i quickly understood your meaning. I think because parts of the post refer to pieces that would fit the technical classical definition of "songs" as songs, and then all pieces generally, as songs. And, as one is reading an essay on classical music the former is assumed. Classical types never tire of pointing this out so you will get this a lot for sure.

And scribble is exactly what he did. Thanks for the kind words.

I intend to do other composers like this. They are all likely false.

Songs/Pieces = You know, I play music like many do and always found that the definition of a piece was odd...did they mean a "piece of rubbish" or a "piece of dirt"? A song makes sense. Music isn't a piece, it has song lines, melodies, movements and parts. That's my interpretation.
 

Will Scarlet

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@luddite very well done. Fascinating and makes you realise just how blindingly (or even deafeningly) obvious Beethoven's fictitious identity is. Would it be fair to say that Beethoven was probably 'Brahms and Liszt'? (Sorry, you really need an understanding of Cockney Rhyming Slang to get that.)
 

E.Bearclaw

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@luddite very well done. Fascinating and makes you realise just how blindingly (or even deafeningly) obvious Beethoven's fictitious identity is. Would it be fair to say that Beethoven was probably 'Brahms and Liszt'? (Sorry, you really need an understanding of Cockney Rhyming Slang to get that.)
I would say he was probably more brown bread.
 

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