SH Archive Great Wall of China: could it be a road?

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KorbenDallas
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The Great Wall of China
Just like about anything else in China, the Wall is not really inspectable via Google Earth, or any other available web mapping services. Examining the available images quickly shows that we are being shown the renovated portion of the wall. I doubt the tourist attraction can provide us with any answers, as to what the remote portions of the wall look like. There are a few interesting images out there, but that's about it.

great wall china.jpg

I was looking at this thread about blown up mountains, and one of the images immediately made me think about the Great Wall of China. I think our wall could be an ancient (or not so ancient) road. I don't know, may be the lower areas were flooded or whatever.

great wall china -3.jpg

I do not believe for a second that it was a defensive structure at any point of its existence. A simple analysis of its defensive qualities shows that is indefensible and unsuppliable.
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Username: f3nt0n
Date: 2020-02-16 01:23:10
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From Wikipedia:

A comprehensive archaeological survey, using advanced technologies, has concluded that the walls built by the Ming dynasty measure 8,850 km (5,500 mi). This is made up of 6,259 km (3,889 mi) sections of actual wall, 359 km (223 mi) of trenches and 2,232 km (1,387 mi) of natural defensive barriers such as hills and rivers. Another archaeological survey found that the entire wall with all of its branches measures out to be 21,196 km (13,171 mi)

I love the way the Wikiboys slipped in 'Another archaeological survey...' at the end, as though it should be given little credence.

13,171 miles.

I agree - a road. One hell of a road.

And it wasn't The Ming Dynasty that built it.
 

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Username: BStankman
Date: 2020-02-16 09:50:50
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Great thought.
In North America we have the Appalachian trail. In South America we have the Inca road system in the Andes.
So yes, it makes sense to me their tartar cousins in Mongolia would have a similar road.

I guess the question would be, why did they continue to use the roads in the rugged terrain after the flood waters receded?
Were the roads in the low lands continually obfuscated by mud floods?
Were they intentionally trying to avoid the starfort canal civilization that were in the river valleys?
Or was it just to dangerous to travel outside of the mountains and and risk being captured and possibly eaten by tall redheads?
 

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Username: Rhayader
Date: 2020-02-16 10:42:12
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The Walls of Benin I think is also a similar construct, and perhaps something that requires more scrutiny and its own thread on here.
 

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Username: Timeshifter
Date: 2020-02-16 10:48:10
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I like your train of thought @KorbenDallas

For me, it looks like a road/ distribution network, at least when viewed like this. How better to cross terrain which would be otherwise dificult or impossible to navigate?

b103ab1e173244009476db62.png
 

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Username: jd755
Date: 2020-02-16 11:33:55
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The only point of a road is what's at the end of it.
To come back to the Great wall = road in 'the east' I recall watching a documentary way back about the construction of the walls using on the ground filming and it seems, from memory, that not only is there is no fully connected wall but a series or group of walls that don't meet up and the construction materials encompass everything from rammed earth to worked stone via brick, mud brick, rough stone.
 

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Username: StarscreamX
Date: 2020-02-16 11:47:50
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It could be a distribution network or a big transport roadway, which could have increased the protection of the traders..

KD edit: the remainder was removed due to derailing properties.
 

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Date: 2020-02-16 13:36:26
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Although from an interesting angle, I fail to see why whoever would go through the trouble of such a massive undertaking if we are dealing with a mountain road system. Why would they have elevated a road constructed in mountainous terrain on massive walls in the first place? secondly if so, than why are there not many underpasses and ramps. Am I missing something? Iv'e remember talk about access points being on the Northern side (where the supposed threat came from), but maybe someone can correct me on that.
 

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Username: Cemen
Date: 2020-02-16 13:56:27
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8148337.jpg
 

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Username: jd755
Date: 2020-02-16 18:18:22
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There you go. How much foot traffic could that thin brick? surface over earth take before it failed?
The wall you labelled 4 doesn't connect to the wall labelled 3 ergo its a different wall.
The wall labelled 2 doesn't connect to the wall labelled 3 either.
In fact there are no visible connection of any of the walls not even the one in the mid background to the left of the hill which wall 1 goes up/comes down.
Artistic licence maybe or a drawing done from soneonne else's desciption/notes/sketch?
Were a road atop any of them it looks unlikely from that engraving's content.
 

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Username: KorbenDallas
Date: 2020-02-16 18:30:40
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I don't know about the artists imagination. This image says drawn from nature.

wall-china.jpg
As far as what connects to what. I'm just trying to point out that as a fortification, the Wall makes very little sense. At the same time getting across them mountains would be much easier by walking on top of the wall.

Additionally those rammed earth sections are attributed to the very early section of the wall. I don't know whether it's BS or not, but that's what they say.
 

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Username: jd755
Date: 2020-02-16 18:43:45
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As far back as I remember I felt the wall had bugger all to defending anything. It wouldn't take much concentrated effort by a small group of men to break through any of them whichever side they were on, no matter what the construction.

The only 'ancient' wall I've stood on and by is Hadrians. It's not big in comparison to the Great walls in its dimensions it's location though does appear in many parts to be a deterrent if you will focussing traffic across it to specific points of control so passage of people, goods, animals, ideas etc fall under whichever authority is in control.
Perhaps that may be reasons for the great walls being constructed where they are.

Don't know obviously but just trying to wander far enough away from the box of mainstream to see something from a different perspective.
 

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Username: jd755
Date: 2020-02-16 19:23:50
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Looks like whoever drew the better quality one copied from the poorer quality one or visa versa!
 

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Username: esgee1
Date: 2020-02-22 05:46:13
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I was going to reply with this as well: the Incan road systems. Romans aren't the only ones who built roads in "ancient" times. The "Great Wall of China" certainly appears to be a protected road way from point a to point b.
 

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Username: tupperaware
Date: 2020-02-22 06:31:26
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Maybe the Wall was just a series of long "forts" to house troops and supplies to protect the Silk Road? Once it got started it was hard to stop construction because everybody considered it "marvelous" Kind of like nuclear weapons.

Great Wall & Silk Road Relation
 

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Seems obvious to me from the drawings that the road used by the horde is right next to the wall....
 

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Date: 2020-02-22 08:59:12
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How about the walls being roads for authority to travel around on away from the great unwashed a Zil lane predecessor so to speak.
Celesttal roads is another option that the religious took as again they were awaay from the heathens and a bit closer to heaven.
Perhaps the heathens/unwashed/peasants were told that those who walked on the walls were their gods keeping an eye on them.
 

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Username: tupperaware
Date: 2020-02-22 09:09:26
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This just out:

Rome unveils tomb that may belong to wolf-suckled king

"Romulus, made popular by writers such as Livy, Ovid and Plutarch, is said to have ploughed a square furrow around the Palatine Hill to demarcate the walls of the future city.
When a mocking Remus hopped over the "wall" to prove how ineffective it would be against invaders, his brother killed him.
A team of scientists carrying out a dig in the late 1980s discovered a long, deep gash marked by large stones, which they claimed was the "sacred furrow" ploughed by Romulus."

So experts think they have discovered Rome's founder's tomb based on unspecified "clues".

Perhaps "ancient" man had an urge to make furrows and walls to keep people out like felines have an urge to spray to mark territory? I know from experience that since I was recently at a feline preservation/breeding compound. The Caracal was spraying every minute or two. Such beautiful and very bored tigers and other felines. Maybe making stupid (ancient) walls and furrows is simply related to who and how many have Toxoplasmosis or how collectively bored a society is?

I think it could date back to Rome's founding but clever people then or later made up the myth around the furrow which was used for other purposes than to keep people out.
 
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