Iron, the Great Protector - its Removal from Society

Will Scarlet

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There seems to be a lot of either confusion or nonsense spoken about iron. You can read that Cast iron was invented by the Chinese in the 5th Century BC. That "Wrought iron" was originally a type of cast iron with a low carbon content, making the iron more malleable and flexible while still retaining much of its durability; this was the type of iron originally used for iron-based construction (the great bridges spanning the world's major rivers were originally crafted from, or reinforced with, wrought iron), and for weapon smithing as well. From a purely material perspective, the distinguishing characteristic of wrought iron is that it has inclusions of silicon and sulfur – slag – which are leftover from the process by which the metal is extracted from the ore. Wrought iron is truly the classical form of iron, and back before the mass production of steel through the Bessemer process, this was the most commonly available form of iron, as steel was far more expensive.”

So wrought iron is cast iron, only different. Then you can read that the casting of iron was only possible when blast furnaces became available during the Industrial Revolution which gave sufficient heat to melt the iron ore. However, this also allowed the production of steel from iron ore, therefore wrought iron became obsolete. The term “wrought iron” was then attached to objects forged from iron by hand. Which was how they did it before the blast furnaces because the normal blacksmith wasn’t able to melt iron ore and pour it into a mould. All he could manage was to heat it until it became malleable and them beat it into shape. Confused? We’ve only just begun, there’s more to come.

In early times the employment of iron in the arts was much restricted by reason of its dull exterior and brittleness. There existed, moreover, among the Romans a certain religious prejudice against the metal, whose use in many ceremonies was wholly proscribed. This prejudice appears to have been due to the fact that iron weapons were held jointly responsible with those who wielded them for the shedding of human blood; inasmuch as swords, knives, battle-axes, lance and spear points, and other implements of war were made of iron.” (Sacred Texts)

Too brittle for use in “the arts”, but fine to use as an anvil, a chisel, sword, shield or an axe. Sounds like nonsense. Then you can read that they had methods for hardening iron, namely quenching (rapid cooling) and tempering (high temperature with slow cooling), but according to other sources, this was mainly used for steel and iron alloys. You will also hear that the purest form of iron comes from meteorites, not iron ore.


The one ancient and universal characteristic of iron is its value as protection against evil spirits, malevolent intentions or psychic attack. The typical witch’s cauldron is a stereotype of this which stems from the many legendary magical cauldrons within the Celtic tradition. Iron’s magnetic and conductive qualities should be mentioned here also. Iron objects, such as horseshoes, would be seen adorning houses both inside and out as protection against poltergeist, malevolent spirits and the mischievous Fae folk, also known as ‘The Gentry’, faeries, goblins etc. These days we’ve been manipulated into referring to such things as aliens, unfortunately. There is a mine of information on this here: Iron as Protective Charm.

2.jpg


Fe or Fae?​

Picture the scene: up until the mass production of steel and aluminium, every house had many iron implements within and around it. Whether the occupants knew it or not, they were spiritually and psychically protected. Let’s now imagine that for whatever reason, ‘interested parties’ wanted to remove that protection. The mass production of steel and aluminium was one method by which this could be achieved, although it could take a very long time before an iron implement needed replacing. There was another way though.

By the time Churchill was successful in implementing World War II there was still a great deal of iron in general use. With the excuse that imports of iron ore were disrupted, the British public were asked to offer up their iron implements – particularly railings – for the ‘war effort’. Aluminium pots and pans were included just to make it seem more credible. The iron railings, which formed a psychic as well as physical barrier to houses and parks, etc., were simply taken away. The only exceptions were if your wrought iron gates were of ‘historical value’ or if you were a member of the appropriate local council. This occurred in many places throughout the UK, not just in London.


Since that time there has been a great deal of evidence to show that this operation was nothing but a total sham, that all the iron ended up at the bottom of the River Thames, in the Irish Sea and in various scrapyards.

This letter was sent to the editor of the London Evening Standard on 24-05-1984:

Letters to the Editor
The Evening Standard

I was interested in your item about the railings which are to be replaced in Ennismore Gardens. The tragedy is that so many of London's railings were pulled down in order to support Britain's war effort, bearing in mind that they never became the guns and tanks they were intended for.

In fact I believe that many hundreds of tons of scrap iron and ornamental railings were sent to the bottom in the Thames Estuary because Britain was unable to process this ironwork into weapons of war.

Christopher Long

Earl's Court Square,
Earl's Court, London SW5.”


This information came from dockers in Canning Town in 1978 who had worked during the war on 'lighters' that were towed down the Thames estuary to dump vast quantities of scrap metal and decorative ironwork. They claimed that so much was dumped at certain spots in the estuary that ships passing the area needed pilots to guide them because their compasses were so strongly affected by the quantity of iron on the sea-bed.” (Christopher Long’s Website)

Also:

Steelworks at places like Port Talbot, Shotton, Sheffield and Motherwell had been in business since the start of the twentieth century and their histories are well documented. Yet, while the removal of the iron is recounted by hundreds of eye witnesses, there are no similar reports of the lorries arriving at the steel works with large quantities of railings and gates to be loaded into the blast furnaces. Lord Beaverbrook was nothing if not thorough and his logistics operations would have been geared to deliver the iron to the steel works.

So what did happen? One school says the iron collected was unsuitable and could not be used. This seems unlikely as recycled iron is a key component in the steel industry. Another more likely explanation is that far more iron was collected - over one millions tons by September 1944 - than was needed or could be processed. Certainly the huge underground munitions factory Beaverbook set up at Corsham in Wiltshire ran far below capacity for its short life.” (London Garden’s Trust)


Of course, no one in their right mind would ever propose that all the iron was removed in order to weaken the population’s defence against psychic attack. Instead it’s all justified by claiming that it was propaganda to make people feel they were contributing to the war effort – which does have some truth to it, although the war effort they were contributing to was the war against themselves.

4.jpg


The Crystal Palace, Sydenham Hill.​

Another example of removing iron from the environment comes in the form of The Crystal Palace on Sydenham Hill just outside London. It’s claimed to have been the same one that was constructed in about 5 minutes by Prince Albert in Hyde Park and housed the Great Exhibition in 1851. However, the Sydenham Hill one was much bigger and very different. It was made mainly of wrought and cast iron and glass of course. It burned down in a mysterious and suspicious fire in 1936 whereby only the two massive water towers remained. Churchill remarked that it was “The end of an era.” The two towers were demolished in 1941 when they were deemed to be a significant landmark enabling enemy bombers to pinpoint London.

5.jpg

The end of an era indeed.

If all this is combined with a concerted effort to poison the landscape by placing nuclear power plants, radio/wifi towers, particle accelerators, wind turbines etc. etc. on significant ley lines, then it’s no surprise that people will develop physical symptoms that can easily be classified as a viral pandemic. The population has not only been cut off from the natural energy of the Earth, but it has also been left wide open to concerted and highly organised psychic attack.

I would be most interested to know if this purging of iron has taken place in any other countries.

Sources and further reading:
 

matematik

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I guess you will resent me saying it, but it has always seemed to me that the British are under particular attack by the "powers that be". Even with this current "pandemic" a disproportionate amount of the focus seems to be on Britain, like how the British are being vaccinated at a much faster rate than anywhere else in Europe, and how many of the "new strains" are being supposedly discovered in Britain and many countries are blaming their pandemics on the "British/English strain", and also all the controversy over AstraZeneca, the so called "British vaccine".

Maybe I am being overly Anglo-centric and not seeing the bigger picture, but the words "Britain" and "England" do seem to appear an awful lot in things related to this "pandemic". Britain is obviously the seat of the royal family and also City of London, so arguably the de facto seat of the NWO, so perhaps that is an explanation for why the "powers that be" would have an interest in asserting spiritual control over the population of this country?

Also, I've noticed that in Spain many houses have these decorative iron bars on the windows, especially in more rural areas. I always assumed that it was just an old fashioned form of security, but having read your post I wonder now whether the origin of the practice is more spiritual?
 

kulapono

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There seems to be a lot of either confusion or nonsense spoken about iron. You can read that Cast iron was invented by the Chinese in the 5th Century BC. That "Wrought iron" was originally a type of cast iron with a low carbon content, making the iron more malleable and flexible while still retaining much of its durability; this was the type of iron originally used for iron-based construction (the great bridges spanning the world's major rivers were originally crafted from, or reinforced with, wrought iron), and for weapon smithing as well. From a purely material perspective, the distinguishing characteristic of wrought iron is that it has inclusions of silicon and sulfur – slag – which are leftover from the process by which the metal is extracted from the ore. Wrought iron is truly the classical form of iron, and back before the mass production of steel through the Bessemer process, this was the most commonly available form of iron, as steel was far more expensive.”

So wrought iron is cast iron, only different. Then you can read that the casting of iron was only possible when blast furnaces became available during the Industrial Revolution which gave sufficient heat to melt the iron ore. However, this also allowed the production of steel from iron ore, therefore wrought iron became obsolete. The term “wrought iron” was then attached to objects forged from iron by hand. Which was how they did it before the blast furnaces because the normal blacksmith wasn’t able to melt iron ore and pour it into a mould. All he could manage was to heat it until it became malleable and them beat it into shape. Confused? We’ve only just begun, there’s more to come.

In early times the employment of iron in the arts was much restricted by reason of its dull exterior and brittleness. There existed, moreover, among the Romans a certain religious prejudice against the metal, whose use in many ceremonies was wholly proscribed. This prejudice appears to have been due to the fact that iron weapons were held jointly responsible with those who wielded them for the shedding of human blood; inasmuch as swords, knives, battle-axes, lance and spear points, and other implements of war were made of iron.” (Sacred Texts)

Too brittle for use in “the arts”, but fine to use as an anvil, a chisel, sword, shield or an axe. Sounds like nonsense. Then you can read that they had methods for hardening iron, namely quenching (rapid cooling) and tempering (high temperature with slow cooling), but according to other sources, this was mainly used for steel and iron alloys. You will also hear that the purest form of iron comes from meteorites, not iron ore.


The one ancient and universal characteristic of iron is its value as protection against evil spirits, malevolent intentions or psychic attack. The typical witch’s cauldron is a stereotype of this which stems from the many legendary magical cauldrons within the Celtic tradition. Iron’s magnetic and conductive qualities should be mentioned here also. Iron objects, such as horseshoes, would be seen adorning houses both inside and out as protection against poltergeist, malevolent spirits and the mischievous Fae folk, also known as ‘The Gentry’, faeries, goblins etc. These days we’ve been manipulated into referring to such things as aliens, unfortunately. There is a mine of information on this here: Iron as Protective Charm.


Picture the scene: up until the mass production of steel and aluminium, every house had many iron implements within and around it. Whether the occupants knew it or not, they were spiritually and psychically protected. Let’s now imagine that for whatever reason, ‘interested parties’ wanted to remove that protection. The mass production of steel and aluminium was one method by which this could be achieved, although it could take a very long time before an iron implement needed replacing. There was another way though.

By the time Churchill was successful in implementing World War II there was still a great deal of iron in general use. With the excuse that imports of iron ore were disrupted, the British public were asked to offer up their iron implements – particularly railings – for the ‘war effort’. Aluminium pots and pans were included just to make it seem more credible. The iron railings, which formed a psychic as well as physical barrier to houses and parks, etc., were simply taken away. The only exceptions were if your wrought iron gates were of ‘historical value’ or if you were a member of the appropriate local council. This occurred in many places throughout the UK, not just in London.


Since that time there has been a great deal of evidence to show that this operation was nothing but a total sham, that all the iron ended up at the bottom of the River Thames, in the Irish Sea and in various scrapyards.

This letter was sent to the editor of the London Evening Standard on 24-05-1984:

Letters to the Editor
The Evening Standard

I was interested in your item about the railings which are to be replaced in Ennismore Gardens. The tragedy is that so many of London's railings were pulled down in order to support Britain's war effort, bearing in mind that they never became the guns and tanks they were intended for.

In fact I believe that many hundreds of tons of scrap iron and ornamental railings were sent to the bottom in the Thames Estuary because Britain was unable to process this ironwork into weapons of war.

Christopher Long

Earl's Court Square,
Earl's Court, London SW5.”


This information came from dockers in Canning Town in 1978 who had worked during the war on 'lighters' that were towed down the Thames estuary to dump vast quantities of scrap metal and decorative ironwork. They claimed that so much was dumped at certain spots in the estuary that ships passing the area needed pilots to guide them because their compasses were so strongly affected by the quantity of iron on the sea-bed.” (Christopher Long’s Website)

Also:

Steelworks at places like Port Talbot, Shotton, Sheffield and Motherwell had been in business since the start of the twentieth century and their histories are well documented. Yet, while the removal of the iron is recounted by hundreds of eye witnesses, there are no similar reports of the lorries arriving at the steel works with large quantities of railings and gates to be loaded into the blast furnaces. Lord Beaverbrook was nothing if not thorough and his logistics operations would have been geared to deliver the iron to the steel works.

So what did happen? One school says the iron collected was unsuitable and could not be used. This seems unlikely as recycled iron is a key component in the steel industry. Another more likely explanation is that far more iron was collected - over one millions tons by September 1944 - than was needed or could be processed. Certainly the huge underground munitions factory Beaverbook set up at Corsham in Wiltshire ran far below capacity for its short life.” (London Garden’s Trust)


Of course, no one in their right mind would ever propose that all the iron was removed in order to weaken the population’s defence against psychic attack. Instead it’s all justified by claiming that it was propaganda to make people feel they were contributing to the war effort – which does have some truth to it, although the war effort they were contributing to was the war against themselves.

View attachment 7765

The Crystal Palace, Sydenham Hill.​

Another example of removing iron from the environment comes in the form of The Crystal Palace on Sydenham Hill just outside London. It’s claimed to have been the same one that was constructed in about 5 minutes by Prince Albert in Hyde Park and housed the Great Exhibition in 1851. However, the Sydenham Hill one was much bigger and very different. It was made mainly of wrought and cast iron and glass of course. It burned down in a mysterious and suspicious fire in 1936 whereby only the two massive water towers remained. Churchill remarked that it was “The end of an era.” The two towers were demolished in 1941 when they were deemed to be a significant landmark enabling enemy bombers to pinpoint London.


The end of an era indeed.

If all this is combined with a concerted effort to poison the landscape by placing nuclear power plants, radio/wifi towers, particle accelerators, wind turbines etc. etc. on significant ley lines, then it’s no surprise that people will develop physical symptoms that can easily be classified as a viral pandemic. The population has not only been cut off from the natural energy of the Earth, but it has also been left wide open to concerted and highly organised psychic attack.

I would be most interested to know if this purging of iron has taken place in any other countries.

Sources and further reading:
WOW! I need to start thinking differently about things like 'war effort rationing and collection.' Sugar? Meat? Certain paint colors? All the bits of information about anything and everything that I simply said 'OK' to.
I remember reading that the Russian army had preferred iron shell casings for artillery, the reasoning behind that was it was cheaper to produce and upon detonation the iron casings fragmented more to be more lethal than steel shell casings. Sounded reasonable to me at the time. But now, was there some other reason, something more 'spiritual?' I should try to forget all that I've learned in my first thirty years.
 

solarbard

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Could this explain humanity's descent into evil and depravity, the breakdown of the family, the rise of violence, the genocides that have marred the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? Did removing iron put us under occupation by some unknown spiritual powers?
 

E.Bearclaw

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Yeah this thread is fascinating. I know it is minor, and more likely irrelevant, but it has made me think of something small. West Ham United used to be, up until 1900, Thames Ironworks FC. A football club for the foremen of Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Co. To this day, the news and media insist on calling them by the nickname "the Hammers". Although most of the fanbase use the nickname "the Irons". This has made me wonder whether that is a deliberate whitewash.

I have in the past suffered iron deficiency. It is horrible. If one hasn't suffered, I felt an overbearing tiredness and a mental fog. Could it be that rather than a deficiency in vital nutrients, leaves one vulnerable to a spiritual attack?

I think it also worthwhile to post a link to 'the last of the Mohicans thread' for the theme is very similar, albeit different geographies. May be of interest to the OP regarding further purges. If you haven't read it, I recommend brewing a cup of tea, or whatever vice you may prefer and settling in for it is both a fascinating history and a wonderful story.

The last of the Mohicans (by tech_dancer)

(and finally a random thought that entered my head. Concerning those ideas of biblical 1000 year cycles. The iron age, if one plays about with timelines a bit - which we are allowed because the timelines are unreliable themselves - was around a 1000 years, was this a "golden age" of spirituality, or some kind of historic disclose by those that write the official history)
 
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luddite

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This information came from dockers in Canning Town in 1978 who had worked during the war on 'lighters' that were towed down the Thames estuary to dump vast quantities of scrap metal and decorative ironwork. They claimed that so much was dumped at certain spots in the estuary that ships passing the area needed pilots to guide them because their compasses were so strongly affected by the quantity of iron on the sea-bed.” (Christopher Long’s Website)
That is a huge amount of iron. Imagine the insanity of that. I wonder if energy flow in rivers (if it is a thing) was also disrupted?

Iron, copper, home forging.... maybe we need to revitalise these ancient arts.

Here is a excellent video I found.


Is it just me of does it actually look doable?
 

Vagabond

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iron casting is very doable, and very cool.
funny thoughts about iron. i like to think itsgoodfor us, but maybe only the ancinet iron, cause new iron, mild steel , is not the same.

i remembered a link to someone on the RH Cprroer thread called ray peat by Lili Kat
he thinks iron is bad for us and in some sense i think he is right.

new iron, is maybe bad for us... But not wrought iron. maybe?

if you think about it, in his reference to a study in AFRICA by the WHO in 1960s well the timeline looks like its right. after the war, wrought iron is gone. it takes a while to get steel circulating and in mass production into people homes and daily life. new iron is different than wrought iron. is whatever is added to the process now, not good for us and this makes it seem iron is not good for us, when in fact we need to live with wrought iron not modern iron.... oh its complicated but i really think there is something to this ..

all of this is making me think these threads about iron, copper, iodine and vitamin supplements are telling us that the old elements , gold, silver, iron, copper ect and very , in fact necessary for us. an aside, mayans used to replace thier healthy teeth with gold teeth. was this just for looks as they tell us? or was it something more
 

luddite

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ron, copper, iodine and vitamin supplements are telling us that the old elements , gold, silver, iron, copper ect and very , in fact necessary for us. an aside
I have been reading them with that in mind also. It is one of those things that is very difficult to prove the good effects because there are just so many items compounding towards one's health.
 

Vagabond

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ron, copper, iodine and vitamin supplements are telling us that the old elements , gold, silver, iron, copper ect and very , in fact necessary for us. an aside
I have been reading them with that in mind also. It is one of those things that is very difficult to prove the good effects because there are just so many items compounding towards one's health.
i agree. and ever so much contradictory messaging.
 

Will Scarlet

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I think there's a danger of derailing this thread by confusing the OP with DIETARY IRON when it's not about that.

new iron is different than wrought iron. is whatever is added to the process now
Which is what? Wrought Iron is 'wrought' by hand - not cast in a mould, but they have the same composition.
 

Vagabond

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Well I asked my partner what the difference was, as he has worked with metals all his life in his career, and has trained for blacksmithing and he told me that the Iron used now which is really mild steel, has different carbon composition than the old wrought iron. Also cast iron has a different composition. I did ask for sources, and he directed me to this article.
It made sense to me.
As to the difference in dietary Iron and the hypothesis laid out in your op, I think they could be related, because a lot of dietary iron used to come from the actual Iron used to make cooking implements. Living with Iron in daily life could have made people feel protected from illness and spirits because of the health benefits?
Sorry if its derailed your thread. not intended.
 

luddite

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I think there's a danger of derailing this thread by confusing the OP with DIETARY IRON when it's not about that.

new iron is different than wrought iron. is whatever is added to the process now
Which is what? Wrought Iron is 'wrought' by hand - not cast in a mold, but they have the same composition.
Agreed, I think there is a belief that the steel, with it's carbon doping to add strength, produces different results for people. It's probably true however is speculation.

If scrap iron is melted down and re-forged then the impurities would be removed in the slag.
 

Will Scarlet

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Iron used now which is really mild steel, has different carbon composition than the old wrought iron. Also cast iron has a different composition. I did ask for sources, and he directed me to this article.
I just read that article and to me it didn't say the same. The composition is the same, there are just differing ratios between the two which makes wrought iron more malleable than cast iron.

"Mild steel that has been machine-bent into shape in a cold state or cast steel and iron pieces that have been painted black are both regularly mislabelled as wrought iron work." (From your link)

So mild steel and wrought iron are different, according to your source.

"The differences can be found in the names: wrought is a past participle of work (“worked iron”), and cast describes anything formed by the casting process." (From your link)

a lot of dietary iron used to come from the actual Iron used to make cooking implements.
Would it really be a significant amount compared to the iron found in food? Since the Industrial Revolution wrought havoc with the vitamin and mineral content of food, thanks to refining and processing, iron has virtually disappeared from our diet along with many other things. Cooking with iron utensils can contribute, but would it really be "a lot"?

in the slag.
Sorry, but whenever anyone uses that word it always reminds me of the old TV series 'Minder'.
 
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Vagabond

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Iron used now which is really mild steel, has different carbon composition than the old wrought iron. Also cast iron has a different composition. I did ask for sources, and he directed me to this article.
I just read that article and to me it didn't say the same. The composition is the same, there are just differing ratios between the two which makes wrought iron more malleable than cast iron.

"Mild steel that has been machine-bent into shape in a cold state or cast steel and iron pieces that have been painted black are both regularly mislabelled as wrought iron work." (From your link)

So mild steel and wrought iron are different, according to your source.

"The differences can be found in the names: wrought is a past participle of work (“worked iron”), and cast describes anything formed by the casting process." (From your link)

a lot of dietary iron used to come from the actual Iron used to make cooking implements.
Would it really be a significant amount compared to the iron found in food? Since the Industrial Revolution wrought havoc with the vitamin and mineral content of food, thanks to refining and processing, iron has virtually disappeared from our diet along with many other things. Cooking with iron utensils can contribute, but would it really be "a lot"?
Maybe it was enough? The part gotten from ancient iron in utensils and food. and being in our daily lives. Its speculation, but of course a lot of these ideas are speculation. So we could entertain the thought.

The article part that I was looking more at was this
"Cast iron can refer to a range of iron alloys, but it is most commonly associated with gray iron. Despite having the name iron, it isn’t pure elemental iron (Fe on the periodic table)—it’s actually an alloy containing 2–4 percent carbon, plus small amounts of silicon and manganese. Other impurities, such as sulfur and phosphorus, are also common."

This was the part that was talking about the differences of cast and wrought. I think. when my partner explained it it made sense, but now Im doubting my comprehension....
 

Will Scarlet

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Apology accepted :cool:
Actually I meant 'The Sweeney', I must be iron deficient.

now Im doubting my comprehension....
I know how you feel. In my research I found that pure iron is only found in meteorites and that iron ore is basically iron plus other stuff mixed in with it in various percentages, so it's always an alloy because of that. In fact, I think that it can be analysed and the imperfections in its composition will show where the ore came from that was used to produce it. Increasing or decreasing the ratios of various imperfections will give different characteristics to the resultant iron. Steel is iron ore with the carbon 'imperfection' greatly enhanced... I think. Like I said in the OP, there's a lot of confusion regarding iron.
 
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Vagabond

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Apology accepted :cool:
Actually I meant 'The Sweeney', I must be iron deficient.

now Im doubting my comprehension....
I know how you feel. In my research I found that pure iron is only found in meteorites and that iron ore is basically iron plus other stuff mixed in with it in various percentages, so it's always an alloy because of that. In fact, I think that it can be analysed and the imperfections in its composition will show where the ore came from that was used to produce it. Increasing or decreasing the ratios of various imperfections will give different characteristics to the resultant iron. Steel is iron ore with the carbon 'imperfection' greatly enhanced... I think. Like I said in the OP, there's a lot of confusion regarding iron.
yes, yes this is the thing. its hard to get to the bottom of it.
my partner knows metal. like very well hes been working with it for 20 years. BUT, when I read him this thread, although he knew there are differences, he had to read a little to try to explain to me and refresh for himself, what they were. He first off said, that old iron, wrought iron, is soft. so i said weak? and he said no no not weak. very strong, but soft. so for weapons, it would be kind of crap. cause it would dull and dent very easily. and cast iron is brittle. you can sometimes break cast iron with a hammer. and mild steel, which they use now, is inferior to iron and especially chinese steel... its very complicated as you say. and now hes not here so im only going off memory.

one thing i will say, we used to live on an old dutch barge from 1909, 19 meters , riveted iron. it was thin, less than 4 mil in some places, but so strong. one day in a storm on the Waal in Netherlands we lost control because we were new to navigating and the current was very strong. we hit a steel pylon and the impact was incredible. we all literally ended up laying out on the floor dazed from the impact and there was a sound like the ringing of a church bell. we finally got safely into harbour, and the next day when the storm cleared, we assessed the damage. except there wasnt any. just literally a big dent in the bow about a 3/4 of a meter across. most other boats would not have survived that impact. the fact it dented rather than shattered or buckled was what kept us afloat. the rivets held, it was a beautiful thing. so, i love iron. like my partner said , its forgiving but very very strong.
 
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Will Scarlet

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Yea I believe the iron sold today is much different then that old iron. You can find some antique iron on etsy.
Yea, its older and wrought instead of cast.

very strong, but soft. so for weapons, it would be kind of crap. cause it would dull and dent very easily. and cast iron is brittle. you can sometimes break cast iron with a hammer
So what were iron weapons made from then, cast, wrought, poached, scrambled or fried iron?
 
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Timeshifter The Great Martian War 1913 - 1917 TV Shows 4
freygeist Great Northern War General 5
Z Serial and experimental the Great War armors and weapons Wars and Conflicts 0
Z The Great Tataria Discovery and Re-Discovery 37
Z The Great Wall of China and New Chinese Antiquities Fake Architects 17
WorldWar1812 1530 The Great Flood of ROME Mud Flood and Dust Storm Theory 5
S The Great Divergence Investigation Requests 3
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Archive SH Archive Freemasons descend from Great Tartaria, and their secret aim is to restore it worldwide. Unmatched 2
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TatarKhan World Greatest Lie?: the Great Wall of China Buildings and Structures 5
F The Betrayal of Albion (Part 4): The Great Fire of London General 2
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KD Archive SH Archive 1885: The Great Fire of Galveston Fires and Earthquakes 0
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R SH Archive The Vacuum Sugar Incident at the 1851 Great Exhibition in London Buildings and Structures 0
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