Is mainstream academia finally coming to terms with forbidden history?

JWW427

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This 2 year old article presents a question for us SH members.
Is mainstream academia finally having to come to terms with the growing body of evidence for ancient high civilizations?
Are they finally caving in because they know what we and the public are up to? That it's inevitable now?
I say yes.
What say all of you?


 
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Whitewave

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This 2 year old article presents a question for us SH members.
Is mainstream academia finally having to come to terms with the growing body of evidence for ancient high civilizations?
Are they finally caving in because they know what we and the public are up to? That it's inevitable now?
I say yes.
What say all of you?


I think only mainstream academia can answer that question. They may all just think we're a bunch of weirdos with kooky ideas and give us a wide berth.

Personally, I don't care if mainstream anything believes differently than me. They can't prove their theses any more than I can prove mine leaving all of us to just have opinions on these matters.

I appreciate their learned opinions but don't necessarily agree with their conclusions (or indoctrination). Those willing to admit "we don't know" or "we're not sure" at least have my respect for their honesty (fwiw).
 

Forrest

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I say no. Both articles are rear-guard shell games of the sort that SA specializes in.

1. "But ever since Nick Bostrom of the University of Oxford wrote a seminal paper about the simulation argument in 2003..."

The simulation argument goes back a long way, and was discussed extensively on the old Extropian list in the 1990's. Participants included Robin Hanson, Anders Sandberg, Max More, Carl Feynman (son of R.), Marvin Minsky, Eli Yudkowsky, Mike Lorrey, Nick Bostrom, and myself, among others. Most of Nick's ideas appear to have been harvested from that discussion. I can recognize at least two of my original contributions in his paper, though not cited by him. In summary, the sim idea suffers a recursion problem- 'who will sim the sim'?, aka 'it's sims all the way down'. (One of my ancillary contributions is the notion that it would take a supercomputer larger than the mass of the known Universe to sim a single atom to infinite accuracy.)
So the chances aren't 50-50, they're 0. It's a long-dead argument.

2. The Silurian Hypothesis is interesting enough, but it has little to do with reconstructing our history, for the obvious reason that we aren't Silurians from 55 million years ago. SA is obviously using the Silurian idea as a vehicle to segue into the fraudulent idea of AGW/Climate Change, since they open with:

"One of the creepier conclusions drawn by scientists studying the Anthropocene—the proposed epoch of Earth’s geologic history in which humankind’s activities dominate the globe—is how closely today’s industrially induced climate change resembles conditions seen in past periods of rapid temperature rise."

Then blah blah and on to an interesting question, one which has been explored by many people over the years, and long before Dr. Who:

"“If an industrial civilization had existed on Earth many millions of years prior to our own era, what traces would it have left and would they be detectable today?”

"After a couple of million years,” Frank says, “the chances are that any physical reminder of your civilization has vanished, so you have to search for things like sedimentary anomalies or isotopic ratios that look off.”

Frank is quite mistaken. Objects which are buried can retain their forms for quite a long time, otherwise there wouldn't be fossils. By mainstream accounts, some of these are hundreds of millions of years old. One idea, from the 1970's iirc, is the Porcelain Strata. Turns out that porcelain is quite immune to chemical breakdown, that's why its used to make labware. Another use is toilets and sinks, millions of them. These are estimated to be able to last for untold hundreds of millions of years when buried and not disturbed, far longer than the most durable seashell. Several km of sedimentary overburden shouldn't affect the material either, as its compressive strength is comparable to rock. So the archaeologist of one billion years from now will have no problem locating our time in the stratigraphic stack- just look for the porcelain.
 
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SuperTrouper

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Look, I'm part of the mainstream academia as I am part of this wonderful community. I am also a father, a son and a husband. It's the roles one plays in one's life, and adapts based on the role required at the time. Most people are not ready for massive paradigm shifting changes over night - from academia, to society or family members. Put yourself in their 'sleeping' shoes. Think about your own awakening journey. As above, so below. New insights have always come in gradually, sometimes with rapid growth spurts. That's why this knowledge upgrade/transition is slow, gradual and carefully (divinely) managed. There are people's lives, health, work and careers at stake. Some academics, who are highly intelligent but 'asleep' have devoted their lives to developing and defending certain theories or 'knowledge'. Their egos (and ego dissolutions) should be managed carefully, with compassion, and support.

In terms of my academic work, I have not been able to write anything substantive after I've discovered new knowledge on SH and elsewhere. I just cannot write about 'stuff' that I do not truly believe in. That's ok and I've manifested a reality in which I am not required to. In my teaching/lecturing/supervision - and also in relationships with family members and members of society at large - it's been all about subtle and gradual changes. Make them think differently without realising it. Let them have "aha" moments without serving it to them on the silver platter. Don't take any credit for it. Let them own it. Although I've been pretty outright here - oftentimes I'm not - it's all about subtlety.
 

codis

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Are they finally caving in because they know what we and the public are up to? That it's inevitable now?
I think not.
History is an important control and manipulation tool, and as such mostly agenda-driven.
Is mainstream academia finally having to come to terms with the growing body of evidence for ancient high civilizations?
This is more so-called "popular science", which should better be called "science fiction". Whenever you find terms like "perhaps", "might be", or "probably" in an article, it is just for public consumption and amusement/shudder.
A honest discussion would provoke serious questions, like, where have this civilisations gone, and why ? The preference of gradualism (vs. catastrophism) and anthropocentric blame game (climate change, mega fauna extinction) is important part of an agenda.
And for science circles, the masters can rely on turf wars and peer revies as "self-regulating", to keep unpleasant ideas and theories at bay.
 

mindcaster

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Look, I'm part of the mainstream academia as I am part of this wonderful community. I am also a father, a son and a husband. It's the roles one plays in one's life, and adapts based on the role required at the time. Most people are not ready for massive paradigm shifting changes over night - from academia, to society or family members. Put yourself in their 'sleeping' shoes. Think about your own awakening journey. As above, so below. New insights have always come in gradually, sometimes with rapid growth spurts. That's why this knowledge upgrade/transition is slow, gradual and carefully (divinely) managed. There are people's lives, health, work and careers at stake. Some academics, who are highly intelligent but 'asleep' have devoted their lives to developing and defending certain theories or 'knowledge'. Their egos (and ego dissolutions) should be managed carefully, with compassion, and support.

In terms of my academic work, I have not been able to write anything substantive after I've discovered new knowledge on SH and elsewhere. I just cannot write about 'stuff' that I do not truly believe in. That's ok and I've manifested a reality in which I am not required to. In my teaching/lecturing/supervision - and also in relationships with family members and members of society at large - it's been all about subtle and gradual changes. Make them think differently without realising it. Let them have "aha" moments without serving it to them on the silver platter. Don't take any credit for it. Let them own it. Although I've been pretty outright here - oftentimes I'm not - it's all about subtlety.
For this very reason/understanding I've built my business (paradigm shift in food system) on two things: game theory (transition model of collaboration) and the credo 'Don't fight but fool the system.' It's working quite well, on all levels :)
 

codis

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For this very reason/understanding I've built my business ... on two things: game theory (transition model of collaboration)...
You are aware that the originator of the game theory, John Nash, was a psychopath ?
His theory thus expresses psychopathic thinking and reasoning.
 

mindcaster

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For this very reason/understanding I've built my business ... on two things: game theory (transition model of collaboration)...
You are aware that the originator of the game theory, John Nash, was a psychopath ?
His theory thus expresses psychopathic thinking and reasoning.
hi Codis,

Nash was not the originator of game theory but a major contributor, specifically with the Nash equilibrium re: strategic interactions. He wasn't diagnosed a psychopath (or whatever you think that means), but with paranoid schizophrenia. He wasn't an axe murderer or evil villain trying to poison mankind. The interesting part of his contributions is how he unraveled the factors that govern chance and decision-making inside complex systems (that have evolved and we continue to build on). This general notion, and practical game mechanics helped me create a model and the tools to punch through conventions and pave a path to a paradigm shift in one important complex system, that of the current food supply chain, relating to production, valuation, market dynamics, cooperation, policy and governance. Strategic interactions form no small part of that.

"His theory thus expresses psychopathic thinking and reasoning." Hence, I reject your conclusion but I do thank you for staying vigilant.
 

codis

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"His theory thus expresses psychopathic thinking and reasoning." Hence, I reject your conclusion but I do thank you for staying vigilant.
You don't need to agree with me. Just do your own research.
But you don't honestly want to tell me you believe to find "psychopath" written in someone's Wackopedia page, do you ?

 
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SonofaBor

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The university agenda is clear to everyone:

1. climate change is the only significant human development-- that is, entropy.

2. overpopulation is the real problem.

3. there's money in them hills: vaccination research

4. control the people, thus: critical discourse theories which crush free speech and free association.

In the good ol' roaring 90s, when grunge played in the streets of Seattle (well, when any music last really played live in Seattle), some researchers were inspired by the work of Walter Benjamin to examine at material remains of cultural locations. Ruins. This has turned into theories of loss and mourning. If SH is ever gonna find a foothold, this is where it might. But the four over riding agendas above put the kibosh on serious inquiry.
 
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SuperTrouper

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For this very reason/understanding I've built my business ... on two things: game theory (transition model of collaboration)...
You are aware that the originator of the game theory, John Nash, was a psychopath ?
His theory thus expresses psychopathic thinking and reasoning.
hi Codis,

Nash was not the originator of game theory but a major contributor, specifically with the Nash equilibrium re: strategic interactions. He wasn't diagnosed a psychopath (or whatever you think that means), but with paranoid schizophrenia. He wasn't an axe murderer or evil villain trying to poison mankind. The interesting part of his contributions is how he unraveled the factors that govern chance and decision-making inside complex systems (that have evolved and we continue to build on). This general notion, and practical game mechanics helped me create a model and the tools to punch through conventions and pave a path to a paradigm shift in one important complex system, that of the current food supply chain, relating to production, valuation, market dynamics, cooperation, policy and governance. Strategic interactions form no small part of that.

"His theory thus expresses psychopathic thinking and reasoning." Hence, I reject your conclusion but I do thank you for staying vigilant.
It's funny how the mainstream creates labels such as "psychopath", "paranoid schizophrenic", "bipolar", etc. for those who do not fit the mould, think differently, see reality differently, and/or otherwise do not fit with into what is considered by society as normative behaviour.

I suspect that many on this forum would have been assigned similar labels because of their views by members of the crumbling establishment. What goes around...
 

codis

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It's funny how the mainstream creates labels such as "psychopath", "paranoid schizophrenic", "bipolar", etc. for those who do not fit the mould, think differently, see reality differently, and/or otherwise do not fit with into what is considered by society as normative behaviour.
Nash was "different" in other ways.
If you are interested, check out the link above.
 

Magnetic

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The amount of intellectual garbage that the "mainstream" puts out there is amazing! Dark matter, dark energy, particle physics, simulation world, multiple universes, germ theory, Darwinism, etc. to keep you fooled and chasing gremlins instead of reality. Most talks at the prestigeous university nearby are propaganda at best. It makes one wonder why it is these world minders are so afraid reality?
Post automatically merged:

I say no. Both articles are rear-guard shell games of the sort that SA specializes in.

1. "But ever since Nick Bostrom of the University of Oxford wrote a seminal paper about the simulation argument in 2003..."

The simulation argument goes back a long way, and was discussed extensively on the old Extropian list in the 1990's. Participants included Robin Hanson, Anders Sandberg, Max More, Carl Feynman (son of R.), Marvin Minsky, Eli Yudkowsky, Mike Lorrey, Nick Bostrom, and myself, among others. Most of Nick's ideas appear to have been harvested from that discussion. I can recognize at least two of my original contributions in his paper, though not cited by him. In summary, the sim idea suffers a recursion problem- 'who will sim the sim'?, aka 'it's sims all the way down'. (One of my ancillary contributions is the notion that it would take a supercomputer larger than the mass of the known Universe to sim a single atom to infinite accuracy.)
So the chances aren't 50-50, they're 0. It's a long-dead argument.

2. The Silurian Hypothesis is interesting enough, but it has little to do with reconstructing our history, for the obvious reason that we aren't Silurians from 55 million years ago. SA is obviously using the Silurian idea as a vehicle to segue into the fraudulent idea of AGW/Climate Change, since they open with:

"One of the creepier conclusions drawn by scientists studying the Anthropocene—the proposed epoch of Earth’s geologic history in which humankind’s activities dominate the globe—is how closely today’s industrially induced climate change resembles conditions seen in past periods of rapid temperature rise."

Then blah blah and on to an interesting question, one which has been explored by many people over the years, and long before Dr. Who:

"“If an industrial civilization had existed on Earth many millions of years prior to our own era, what traces would it have left and would they be detectable today?”

"After a couple of million years,” Frank says, “the chances are that any physical reminder of your civilization has vanished, so you have to search for things like sedimentary anomalies or isotopic ratios that look off.”

Frank is quite mistaken. Objects which are buried can retain their forms for quite a long time, otherwise there wouldn't be fossils. By mainstream accounts, some of these are hundreds of millions of years old. One idea, from the 1970's iirc, is the Porcelain Strata. Turns out that porcelain is quite immune to chemical breakdown, that's why its used to make labware. Another use is toilets and sinks, millions of them. These are estimated to be able to last for untold hundreds of millions of years when buried and not disturbed, far longer than the most durable seashell. Several km of sedimentary overburden shouldn't affect the material either, as its compressive strength is comparable to rock. So the archaeologist of one billion years from now will have no problem locating our time in the stratigraphic stack- just look for the porcelain.
What you say is true about porcelain but that is under current conditions. When the changeover occurs fantastic forces of electricity, dielectricity and magnetism can change trees into rocks(petrified wood), melt cities to make mountains, create radioactive elements, etc. There are many examples of metal being oxidized and transformed in many "natural" formations, mountains riddled with square holes and beam like shapes. See the Wise Up channel on themtoob to see it yourself.
 
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SonofaBor

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Not only that but they affixiate families with crushing debt. Long ago they payed off the proles by pushing college sports-- of course, this is a form of slavery. They are more than complicit in the intellectual, economic and moral degeneration of the populace. People send their children to them out of habit and aspirations. And they go to work on their minds, turning them into complicit but opportunistic slaves-- mirrors of themselves. The universities are part of the swamp. If the revolution succeeds, I hope the universities will be outed and reformed. But I doubt it. They believe their own lies.
 

JWW427

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Excellent replies to this thread.

I cannot agree more on universities. The fancier the school, the deeper the manure pile.
Secret societies recruit fascist-minded students and funnel them into the Deep State. Ive seen it with my own eyes. My school UVA had the super-secret Seven Society and IMP. At Yale its Scroll & Key and Skull & Bones. Both Thule Society related. Perhaps most of them are?
Universities teach kids what to think not how to think. Group dependency and the concept of conformity are seen as collegiate virtues despite minor "progressive" protests here and there.

Pearson Inc., the education conglomerate, wants to privatize world education with corporate-run schools, a $5.5 trillion worldwide market. Big corporations don’t give a hoot about students, they’re only interested in the drone-like team player, the collective, conformity, and, of course, big profits. They want the world ignorant, obedient, and compliant. Inconvenient history and unacknowledged scientific truths will be omitted, and only “approved” information will be quickly added/changed via electronic devices and the internet.
If a student asks a question on the approved university search system (some schools are talking about proprietary tablets), answers like the OP articles will pop up to confuse them with BS.
Alternative sites like SH 2.0 will be banned and probably are right now!

P.jpeg

All textbooks (now electronic) are designed on purpose to compartmentalize information into confusing bits that can’t easily be connected into a big overall picture. The three holy cows of our educational system are all perpetuated lies: That matter and energy cannot be created or destroyed (It can be created by consciousness), that humans evolved from apes, and that nothing can go faster than the speed of light. (See: "Hypersound." US Army L-RAD system).

L.jpeg

An alarm claxon should be going off in your head right about now––general quarters!
Sorry to derail my own thread, but what the heck. Mainstream academia is trying to manipulate the "Great Awakening" since they know full well they cant stop it, even if universities go all electronic. The worldwide PTB knows this too. They will desperately try to manipulate the whole of human consciousness by muddying the Mekong River of disclosure with more lies and distractions.
Believe me, I was distracted by UVA winning the Final Four in basketball last year. I knew it was a major one, but I enjoyed it anyway.
 
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Forrest

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The amount of intellectual garbage that the "mainstream" puts out there is amazing! Dark matter, dark energy, particle physics, simulation world, multiple universes, germ theory, Darwinism, etc. to keep you fooled and chasing gremlins instead of reality. Most talks at the prestigeous university nearby are propaganda at best. It makes one wonder why it is these world minders are so afraid reality?
Post automatically merged:

I say no. Both articles are rear-guard shell games of the sort that SA specializes in.

"“If an industrial civilization had existed on Earth many millions of years prior to our own era, what traces would it have left and would they be detectable today?”

"After a couple of million years,” Frank says, “the chances are that any physical reminder of your civilization has vanished, so you have to search for things like sedimentary anomalies or isotopic ratios that look off.”

Frank is quite mistaken. Objects which are buried can retain their forms for quite a long time, otherwise there wouldn't be fossils. By mainstream accounts, some of these are hundreds of millions of years old. One idea, from the 1970's iirc, is the Porcelain Strata. Turns out that porcelain is quite immune to chemical breakdown, that's why its used to make labware. Another use is toilets and sinks, millions of them. These are estimated to be able to last for untold hundreds of millions of years when buried and not disturbed, far longer than the most durable seashell. Several km of sedimentary overburden shouldn't affect the material either, as its compressive strength is comparable to rock. So the archaeologist of one billion years from now will have no problem locating our time in the stratigraphic stack- just look for the porcelain.
What you say is true about porcelain but that is under current conditions. When the changeover occurs fantastic forces of electricity, dielectricity and magnetism can change trees into rocks(petrified wood), melt cities to make mountains, create radioactive elements, etc. There are many examples of metal being oxidized and transformed in many "natural" formations, mountains riddled with square holes and beam like shapes. See the Wise Up channel on themtoob to see it yourself.

Wise Up, though interesting, tends to over reach. WISE UP

The business about the tool marks in the Aswan quarry being tire tracks is a case in point. I covered the Dragon Houses in a different venue awhile ago. In short, these all appear to made of common rock, with the possible exception of a piece of petrified wood sitting by the Styria Gate, bottom right.

Always ask yourself, regardless of the source: What parts of these kinds of ideas are uninformed sincerity, what part click bait, what part deliberate disinformation?

Any planetary-scale dis-aster, Electric Universe or otherwise, large enough to render all the porcelain (diorite, granite, limestone, etc.) unrecognizable will also make the entire surface of the planet unrecognizable. We don't find that, the physical evidence shows separate, individual catastrophes, always restricted in extent and impact- the Drift, the sea level rise, the Sahara+, etc. It can total up to cover much of the surface worldwide, and result in a worldwide loss of civilization, fortunately without erasing everything and leaving nothing left for SH to hash over.
 

luddite

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In summary, the sim idea suffers a recursion problem- 'who will sim the sim'?, aka 'it's sims all the way down'. (One of my ancillary contributions is the notion that it would take a supercomputer larger than the mass of the known Universe to sim a single atom to infinite accuracy.)
So the chances aren't 50-50, they're 0. It's a long-dead argument.
Hi @Forrest , although I 100% agree with you I would like to play devils advocate and possibly offer a deviation to the sim theory.

Sim theory itself, while flawed, takes into account our human assumptions. Assumptions of physics and the nature of our belief systems could also be injected into any sim. Let me expand.
  1. Sim theory assumes a universe. Why? What if that is dissinfo. Flat earth, firmament, closed system theories all exist also. They would be much easier to program/control in a sim.
  2. Atoms:
    1. Maybe atoms don't even exist but test results are programmed into the sim to give the appearance of their existence.
    2. The science on atom really breaks down when you get to gravity, sub-particles(quarks, sub-quarks, muons, tuons etc) and any sim would just halt attempts at looking behind the veil by recursive bad data. That's where we are at now with CERN, LHC etc. The results they get are all statistical and non-repeatable.
  3. Introducing the Schrodinger duality principle into a sim and you really have a egg omelette on your hands. Why would a sim do that? It would seem like a hugely over engineered addition to any system.
  4. Our beliefs: At some point society gets idea's from somewhere... people, books, ancient scrolls ;-) - so the sim could guide beliefs over time if it was an actively involved sim program.
TL;DR: Any sim could fabricate and control all outcomes of any test for it's own purpose and we would be unable to discern that fabrication.
 

Forrest

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In summary, the sim idea suffers a recursion problem- 'who will sim the sim'?, aka 'it's sims all the way down'. (One of my ancillary contributions is the notion that it would take a supercomputer larger than the mass of the known Universe to sim a single atom to infinite accuracy.)
So the chances aren't 50-50, they're 0. It's a long-dead argument.
Hi @Forrest , although I 100% agree with you I would like to play devils advocate and possibly offer a deviation to the sim theory.

Sim theory itself, while flawed, takes into account our human assumptions. Assumptions of physics and the nature of our belief systems could also be injected into any sim. Let me expand.
  1. Sim theory assumes a universe. Why? What if that is dissinfo. Flat earth, firmament, closed system theories all exist also. They would be much easier to program/control in a sim.
  2. Atoms:
    1. Maybe atoms don't even exist but test results are programmed into the sim to give the appearance of their existence.
    2. The science on atom really breaks down when you get to gravity, sub-particles(quarks, sub-quarks, muons, tuons etc) and any sim would just halt attempts at looking behind the veil by recursive bad data. That's where we are at now with CERN, LHC etc. The results they get are all statistical and non-repeatable.
  3. Introducing the Schrodinger duality principle into a sim and you really have a egg omelette on your hands. Why would a sim do that? It would seem like a hugely over engineered addition to any system.
  4. Our beliefs: At some point society gets idea's from somewhere... people, books, ancient scrolls ;-) - so the sim could guide beliefs over time if it was an actively involved sim program.
TL;DR: Any sim could fabricate and control all outcomes of any test for it's own purpose and we would be unable to discern that fabrication.
The margin of this post is much to small to contain an adequate response. I don't have access to enough sim engine.
 

codis

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Any planetary-scale dis-aster, Electric Universe or otherwise, large enough to render all the porcelain (diorite, granite, limestone, etc.) unrecognizable will also make the entire surface of the planet unrecognizable. We don't find that, the physical evidence shows separate, individual catastrophes, always restricted in extent and impact- the Drift, the sea level rise, the Sahara+, etc. It can total up to cover much of the surface worldwide, and result in a worldwide loss of civilization, fortunately without erasing everything and leaving nothing left for SH to hash over.
That depends.
A meteorite mid-air explosion would affect only a limited area in that way, also a ground impact. Depending on size, the aftereffects would be felt workdwide.
I find the solar micro nova (plasma universe) theory more plausible. Such an event would fry only the directly exposed surfaces (vitrified surfaces and buildings in Africa and India ?), but tremendously effect climate, flora and fauna. Which, by the way, sounds much more plausible to me than ancient nuclear weapons.
The theory also suggests that the earth's crust rests on some pillars reaching through liquid (molten) layers. Electric currents induced through such an event could melt them temporarily, and make the crust float freely on the molten layer. It would then follow gravity and inertia, which would look like the sun is standing still, turning sideways or even backward.
 

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