• Update Success: Forum is back up after a huge content injection of recovered threads and replies: Details here.

Lewis and Clark Expo Portland 1905

UnderTheOaks

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
14
Website
www.zeemaps.com
Hello Friends,

Very interesting to look at photos from the 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition in Portland, Oregon. In the archives, there is a picture of before in 1904 and after in 1905, creating the narrative that all of these buildings were built in one year.

This is the picture from the Oregon Digital archives showing a picture of 1904 of the building site of what will be the expo.
1602855011499.png


This is a picture from the same archives showing a picture of 1905 of the Expo:
1602855201205.png


Clearly you can see that level of construction of these buildings, a bridge, and that to construct this from 1904 and finish in 1905 would be a heroic feat. It would make more sense if the "before" picture is actually taken after. The reason is that in the 1904 picture, it looks like there are remains of the small pillars of stone from the center of the Expo area (shown in the picture below), and it also appears there is a walkway or paved area remaining on the island area.


1602855677074.jpeg




Was this built in one year?
View attachment 1602854383195.png



In the Picture below, what I found interesting was
1)The uniforms worn several men. I am not an expert on uniforms so I searched a bit to see what the uniforms looked like in 1905, I didn't find any that looked liked these.
2) This does not look like a brand new building
3) Why is the dark crest in the center represent the flag of missouri? with the bear and crescent moon?


View attachment 1602855953692.png





Check out the digital archives here:
 

Attachments

Forrest

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
39
Reaction score
78
Was this built in one year?
View attachment 1602854383195.png

Yes. It's like a movie set, an elaborate facade. Notice the building has no obvious evidence of masonry, ashlar, etc. The entire structure could be made of painted wood and plaster. Look closely at this image and the others. There are no signs of erosion or discoloration. They look brand new. The dome on the Ag building looks like it was shingled with pieces of hammered sheet metal, which could be done in a few days.
1602912659342.png


The bridge is made of wood and wooden pilings in shallow water, the water was an existing backwater of the Willamette, since filled in. Picture of its construction-
1602912484634.png
 

Armouro

New member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
18
Possible.

At the time, jobs were in the trades, and the labour. Not hard for a man to make his way across the continent plying a trade, swinging a hammer or digging a hole. The surplus of work at the time was, according to my humble researches, unheard of anywhere else in the world.
I think that at this juncture of study into the fairs themselves, a different set of questions must be asked.

1: From whence is the myth and esoterica drawn, in the constructions? (the esoteric is so plain that it must be addressed by SOMEONE)
2: Who specifically financed these labours, and to what end?
3: Can these locations be connected to outcroppings of still-existing shanty-towns that may have housed the labourers?
4: Can these locations be connected with sites of archeological significance?

There are many places out here in the PNW that seem to make very little sense. I would recommend one, if you have an interest in this region.
The Pittocks, and their mansion.


 

BStankman

Member
Trusted Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2020
Messages
36
Reaction score
76
Location
parts unknown
Some of this is laughably facade.
Carnival of Venice and The Trail are what you would expect for 1905 temporaries.
Off topic you can see the pre WW1 German presence on The Trail, and there was a German day.

dc231f49-9e65-4178-967f-765fe7032f33-ba020848_141.jpg


95e59891-b4ce-4ec0-ba48-e0f8d22c6c8e-bb000390_141.jpg



It looks like we finally get a sky in 1905, and Baldwin's Airship is present, selling tickets.
Not exactly sure if these are tickets for passengers, or what kind of cargo this was capable of carrying.
According to Wikipedia sources, Baldwin sold one of his dirigibles to the US military in 1908 for signal use.
The balloon bomb patent of 1863 was designated as an improvement, but maybe a different thread for that.


9c34fd5a-d1cd-403c-b3b7-aa15838743ef-bb000405.jpg


993fab46-bf28-4409-9945-7295087a9f97-bb000399.jpg


baldwin.jpg

"Westward the Course of Empire takes its Way"
That is an odd slogan for a pre WW1 US. Not exactly a world superpower.
Maybe it refers to the Indian Wars still going on into the 20th century, and the Indian nations taken were something different than the narrative tells us.

Japan day is coming Aug 81
There will be lantern lights and fireworks.

japan day.JPG


This is the Oriental Palace.
Not exactly Asian looking. But maybe it is representative of what a Fou-Sang culture was building in the Oregon territory up to 1848.

f22ca449-d930-4183-a2de-85a9688575bc-bb000411_141.jpg

 
Last edited:

JWW427

Well-known member
Trusted Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2020
Messages
202
Reaction score
504
Location
Wash. DC.
A lot of what these expos were about was geopolitical programming and propaganda.
The style of the building leaves one wondering what that was all about.
 

Akanah

New member
Joined
Sep 26, 2020
Messages
14
Reaction score
23
Location
Germany
In Germany we have the saying "beautiful facade but nothing behind it." Maybe after the mudflood the people made quickly fake facade to show how nice the world looked like previously. A little bit I am thinking of amusement parks in this photos, for distract traumatized people.
 

Forrest

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
39
Reaction score
78
Maybe there are companies that rent out the statues and fancy architectural details, the same as costume and party supply places. The stuff from one world exhibition would be dismantled and stored in their warehouses, ready for the next customer the next year. Along with that, they might have a design office, with ready-made plans for the various buildings, or alter to suit. One way of checking this is to look at the statues, etc. in the photos from different exhibitions held in different years, looking for matches.
 

UnderTheOaks

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
14
Website
www.zeemaps.com
And regarding the initial post, I see now that I was looking at what is the Missouri Building, although the picture on the right lacks the crest shown in the other picture but is labeled on the postcard.
View attachment 1602954522402.png
1602954054769.png

Post automatically merged:

Maybe there are companies that rent out the statues and fancy architectural details, the same as costume and party supply places. The stuff from one world exhibition would be dismantled and stored in their warehouses, ready for the next customer the next year. Along with that, they might have a design office, with ready-made plans for the various buildings, or alter to suit. One way of checking this is to look at the statues, etc. in the photos from different exhibitions held in different years, looking for matches.

Very interesting, I couldn't help but do a little searching on this. What I found was that the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company was the company who supplied the statues.

"Many elaborate and costly exhibits were sent intact to Portland, and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company donated a number of the finest groups of statuary which had adorned the grounds of the St. Louis Fair . These were placed with marked artistic skill and added wonderfully to the embellishment of the grounds ."

New York at the Lewis and Clark exposition.
Portland, Oregon, June 1 to October 15, 1905.

 
Last edited:

Forrest

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
39
Reaction score
78
And regarding the initial post, I see now that I was looking at what is the Missouri Building, although the picture on the right lacks the crest shown in the other picture but is labeled on the postcard.
View attachment 1341View attachment 1340
Post automatically merged:

Maybe there are companies that rent out the statues and fancy architectural details, the same as costume and party supply places. The stuff from one world exhibition would be dismantled and stored in their warehouses, ready for the next customer the next year. Along with that, they might have a design office, with ready-made plans for the various buildings, or alter to suit. One way of checking this is to look at the statues, etc. in the photos from different exhibitions held in different years, looking for matches.

Very interesting, I couldn't help but do a little searching on this. What I found was that the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company was the company who supplied the statues.

"Many elaborate and costly exhibits were sent intact to Portland, and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company donated a number of the finest groups of statuary which had adorned the grounds of the St. Louis Fair . These were placed with marked artistic skill and added wonderfully to the embellishment of the grounds ."

New York at the Lewis and Clark exposition.
Portland, Oregon, June 1 to October 15, 1905.

Nice work!

There probably were (and are) other such rental outlets as well. This could also help explain why the world's fairs were torn down so rapidly- they had to get the rental gear back to the company asap. Just like any rental, the clock starts ticking when the contract is signed and the stuff goes out the door.
 

Armouro

New member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
18
In Germany we have the saying "beautiful facade but nothing behind it." Maybe after the mudflood the people made quickly fake facade to show how nice the world looked like previously. A little bit I am thinking of amusement parks in this photos, for distract traumatized people.
Funny, that. Many small towns used square-front facades on the street-facing sides of their buildings. No official reason for the facades exists.
Post automatically merged:

Maybe there are companies that rent out the statues and fancy architectural details, the same as costume and party supply places. The stuff from one world exhibition would be dismantled and stored in their warehouses, ready for the next customer the next year. Along with that, they might have a design office, with ready-made plans for the various buildings, or alter to suit. One way of checking this is to look at the statues, etc. in the photos from different exhibitions held in different years, looking for matches.
We can hunt for matches, but without ever having seen a company doing so, or a definite re-placing of an item, we have no basis to believe reuse was something that occurred.
 
Top