Possible stone ruins from the last ice age in New England.

skogen

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Since last year I have been exploring the stoneworks on the mountains and hillsides of the Connecticut River Valley. After a few months of exploring I realized there was no stonework around the river itself. Looking into why there was none around the River I learned about Glacial Lake Hitchcock which the shoreline now sits at 600 feet above sea level and oddly enough this is where the stonework starts. Looking into this further started to see many different sites that started right around the shoreline and went up mountain/hillsides. Here are some of the stoneworks from the area.
20201127_153909.jpg

Some kind of walled foundation. The two boulders are roughly 5 feet tall, 5 feet and 10 feet long. The longer wall has stacked stones on top of it.

20201129_130949.jpg

Not far from the foundation is this spring well made along a stonewall. Water still runs out of it.
20201228_145024.jpg

A snake effigy at the start of a long wall that is aligned to the winter solstice sunset.
20210324_150155.jpg

A stone circle set a top of bedrock on a mountain top. There is a placed quartz stone and a standing stone in the back that is aligned to a mountain across the valley and the winter solstice sunrise.
20210503_135430.jpg

This is the end of a wall that starts at an inlet of Glacial Lake Hitchcock and goes through a boulder field that has massive boulders on the hilltop.
20210503_134752.jpg

One of the boulders above the wall in the boulder field. Roughly 30 feet tall.
20210406_160404.jpg

A standing stone that appears to be almost in the shape of a human. Found on the land when a house was being built.
20210402_154046.jpg

Another snake effigy which is a very common theme around here in the stonewalls. This one is very unique with the fact it was built to have water run through it.
20210402_154211.jpg

Same effigy as above.

That is just some of the finding from the area.
 

trismegistus

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I think this is deserving of its own thread, but I will leave a link to a similar thread for those to check out. It has some supplemental material I think is worth considering when it comes to these stone structures.


Thread 'Stone Chambers of North Eastern America'
Stone Chambers of North Eastern America
 

kulapono

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Since last year I have been exploring the stoneworks on the mountains and hillsides of the Connecticut River Valley. After a few months of exploring I realized there was no stonework around the river itself. Looking into why there was none around the River I learned about Glacial Lake Hitchcock which the shoreline now sits at 600 feet above sea level and oddly enough this is where the stonework starts. Looking into this further started to see many different sites that started right around the shoreline and went up mountain/hillsides. Here are some of the stoneworks from the area.
View attachment 11466
Some kind of walled foundation. The two boulders are roughly 5 feet tall, 5 feet and 10 feet long. The longer wall has stacked stones on top of it.

View attachment 11467
Not far from the foundation is this spring well made along a stonewall. Water still runs out of it.
View attachment 11468
A snake effigy at the start of a long wall that is aligned to the winter solstice sunset.
View attachment 11470
A stone circle set a top of bedrock on a mountain top. There is a placed quartz stone and a standing stone in the back that is aligned to a mountain across the valley and the winter solstice sunrise.
View attachment 11471
This is the end of a wall that starts at an inlet of Glacial Lake Hitchcock and goes through a boulder field that has massive boulders on the hilltop.
View attachment 11473
One of the boulders above the wall in the boulder field. Roughly 30 feet tall.
View attachment 11474
A standing stone that appears to be almost in the shape of a human. Found on the land when a house was being built.
View attachment 11475
Another snake effigy which is a very common theme around here in the stonewalls. This one is very unique with the fact it was built to have water run through it.
View attachment 11476
Same effigy as above.

That is just some of the finding from the area.
Outstanding! I would not have noticed most of this. Maybe the dog is so relaxed bathing in the aura of that 'human appearing' stone?
 

BStankman

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After a few months of exploring I realized there was no stonework around the river itself.

Yes, that is the same conclusion I came to in this excellent thread by Magnus.
Dating Mud Flood, and why it couldn't have been recent within 150/200 years

The stone walls of New England certainly are an enigma. Their total volume, estimated at 60 times that of the great pyramid, makes the narrative of their construction by the colonists seem a little far fetched. Much like that of the Erie canal.

Thanks for bringing up Lake Hitchcock. But I would question what you are seeing is 10,000 years old or could it be merely 500.



hitchcock.jpg



The history on New England is a bit of a black hole prior to 1620 Mayflower. And we haven't been told the fully story.
We do know the Pilgrims were expecting to find a much more populated area from the writing of John Ogilby.
The colonists expected to find French, Dutch, Jews, and native Indians already there, and were prepared for conflict. p145

p145.JPG

Instead they found devastation, and a collapsed civilization. p143
A civilization that had streets present, and not a wilderness of hunter gatherers.

p143.JPG

Here they have no explanation for this other than a possible comet. Small pocks or syphilis could certainly be a contributing factor.
But what about Lake Hitchcock? Is it possible it was still present in 1492?

Recalling the history of Mexico City and rumors of Jesuits sabotaging the lake there. Is it possible an advanced party of Jesuits sabotaged the natural or man made dam in Rocky Hill between 1492 and 1620? To collapse the existing civilization and open it up for colonization.

The description of the Mohawk Indians appears to be a reflection to the Mad Max legend of what will occur when our current civilization collapses. A savage tribe of cannibals that lives off the carcass of the old world through violence and plunder. p150


p150.JPG


wez.jpg
 
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laurence.marie

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I have found similar stone structures in Maine and in New Brunswick (Canada)...as a dowser and vibrational Radiesthesist I am able to measure the energy of those places. In ancient times, people built their temples/sacred places where the energy was high ( Power Spot) and built the rest of the village in such a way that everyone benefited. Megalithic people did that..Egyptians and other civilizations...
 

skogen

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Outstanding! I would not have noticed most of this. Maybe the dog is so relaxed bathing in the aura of that 'human appearing' stone?
Maybe, that standing stone could possible be part of a hunting drive. Here is a pdf file about it, the landscape its on and the stonework that fills in the gaps between cliff bands in the valley.
Yes, that is the same conclusion I came to in this excellent thread by Magnus.
Dating Mud Flood, and why it couldn't have been recent within 150/200 years

The stone walls of New England certainly are an enigma. Their total volume, estimated at 60 times that of the great pyramid, makes the narrative of their construction by the colonists seem a little far fetched. Much like that of the Erie canal.

Thanks for bringing up Lake Hitchcock. But I would question what you are seeing is 10,000 years old or could it be merely 500.


The history on New England is a bit of a black hole prior to 1620 Mayflower. And we haven't been told the fully story.
We do know the Pilgrims were expecting to find a much more populated area from the writing of John Ogilby.
The colonists expected to find French, Dutch, Jews, and native Indians already there, and were prepared for conflict. p145

Instead they found devastation, and a collapsed civilization. p143
A civilization that had streets present, and not a wilderness of hunter gatherers.

Here they have no explanation for this other than a possible comet. Small pocks or syphilis could certainly be a contributing factor.
But what about Lake Hitchcock? Is it possible it was still present in 1492?

Recalling the history of Mexico City and rumors of Jesuits sabotaging the lake there. Is it possible an advanced party of Jesuits sabotaged the natural or man made dam in Rocky Hill between 1492 and 1620? To collapse the existing civilization and open it up for colonization.

The description of the Mohawk Indians appears to be a reflection to the Mad Max legend of what will occur when our current civilization collapses. A savage tribe of cannibals that lives off the carcass of the old world through violence and plunder. p150

Hard to say about the dates i'm just sharing what I have been finding and the locations related to the lake that was once here.

I have found evidence of possible road systems they are usually narrow like a hiking trail but much smoother especially for the locations on mountain sides. With stone work on one side to help keep them from washing away.

This summer I have found two large man made dams that seem to be over engineered for the size of the waterways they are on. Reached out to the town historical societies that the damns are in and neither one of them knew about them nor did the town halls. Contacted a professor that studies Native American stone work like that and he couldn't provide any help either and asked me to contract the people I already talked to.
20210514_152638.jpg

This dam is in a narrow mountain valley that has a small stream running down it. You can see the culvert in the middle of the dam but water no longer runs out of it.
20210514_152750.jpg

The water has been rerouted around the dam due to soil build up behind the dam.
20210514_152709.jpg

20210527_152234 (2).jpg

A few towns away from the first dam is this one, it is much larger and still has water running through it.
20210527_152608 (1).jpg

This is the end of the dam its a larger boulder that to me looks a like a wing.
20210527_152633 (1).jpg

Same boulder as above and the start of the dry stone work for the dam.
20210527_152618.jpg

Total length of it is roughly a 100 feet and highest point it around 25 feet.
20210527_152348.jpg

Backside of the dam you can see the small stream between the gap in the trees.
 

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Maxresde

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This is very interesting. There are a couple of people in Mass. - Mary Gage and James Gage. They have a website, but I can't find it right now. I have one of their books. It has a website on the back for their publisher www.powwowriverbooks.com . It may have contact info. The book is 'A Guide to New England Stone Structures'. It has one page on dams. They might be interested to have a look at your discoveries. Jim Vieira might be a good person to look at as well. I don't recall from any of his youtube videos really hearing much about dams.
 

BStankman

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Jim Vieira might be a good person to look at as well.

This is Bill Vieira from 2011. Well ahead of the curve, but perhaps stuck in the Graham Hancock version of history.
A Mystery Explored: Who Built New England’s Stone Walls?

I highlighted some of the more pertinent to stolenhistory, and it is worth a full read.


The stone walls of New England. Local folklore states that every stone wall you see was built sometime in the last 400 years. This seems like a reasonable supposition at first glance. Colonials definitely built walls for property boundaries and agricultural uses. Timber eventually became scarce in the colonies and fencing was needed as land was farmed and livestock raised. We are told that the majority of the walls were built in a roughly 50-year window between the Revolutionary and Civil wars. How many walls did and does New England actually have?
A 1939 study done by an engineer using agricultural records estimated there were 240,000 miles of stone walls east of the Hudson River right after the Civil War. This very conservative estimate was done using incomplete data and didn't account for other areas in the Northeast that possess large numbers of stone walls.
The actual figure is well over 500,000 miles, many researchers estimate — equivalent to a stone wall that circles the earth 20 times or all the way to the moon and back. Does it seem likely that a colonial population struggling for survival, involved in several all-encompassing wars and working difficult and unforgiving land could have accomplished this feat? It would have been the most costly and labor-intensive undertaking in colonial history. The total sheer tonnage of New England stone walls represents an amount greater than all the world’s pyramids, stone temples, stone complexes and ancient stone structures combined.

An indication of the antiquity of many walls is their seemingly irrational construction and placement. If the reason for walls was for agricultural purposes and boundary markers, then a massive amount fall into some unknown realm. There are stone walls 12 feet high with 20 foot bases, walls that undulate wildly, tying into huge glacial erratics, beginning and ending without seeming purpose and defining no boundary; walls that are balanced with exact precision and have large holes throughout their entire length; walls with precise geometric shapes such as squares, triangles and rectangles embedded in them; walls that have the exact same strange building techniques used in Martha's Vineyard to Pennsylvania and all around New England including in Ashfield, Plainfield, Hawley and other surrounding towns.
There are walls that follow no property boundaries or deed lines; walls that enclose huge swamps, climbing up 30-foot cliffs, using precariously perched stones weighing 5,000 and 10,000 pounds apiece; walls that consist of quartz that geologists determined to be brought from miles away because the area in question possessed none; stones actually quarried and used in construction when there is ample stone in close proximity if the purpose was to clear land or build boundaries; quartz quarried and made into walls, walls that end abruptly with serpent and effigy heads, walls with massive amounts of stone cairns and effigy mounds next to them that have the same construction techniques; walls over mountains that were never settled or farmed; walls that head straight up mountains built on such extreme slopes that your lungs burn just to walk them — many, many walls that use countless stones weighing several tons in totally inaccessible areas that could not have been made without the benefit of beasts of burden.
All this is backed up with colonial reports of walls existing when they arrived here and old records referring to Indian stone fences or walls that existed before colonials.


This playlist also covers the topic. Not the best presentation, but worthy of a mention.

View: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdUyWiIu8Ft70bOsB43cY7ZJMHJiJH5Mp


In this series of videos I dismantle the mainstream academic history on the stone walls of New York and New England. Remember that I and other researchers do not say that colonists and settlers didn't build any stone walls, they most certainly did but the style of construction is far different that the primitive stone walls found throughout this region in areas that are not conducive to farming or anything else maybe timber harvesting and even then these areas are difficult to work in.

Weighing on the evidence, one could reasonably conclude the New England stone wall system is the greatest engineering feat of pre history, and it is has been hidden in plain sight by a narrative that does not hold up to minor scrutiny.
It would be interesting if we could get a Native American elder to comment on them. I have only heard legends that these were built by the old people. IE a population that lived in the area prior to the Amerindians moving to the area.
 

skogen

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In this series of videos I dismantle the mainstream academic history on the stone walls of New York and New England. Remember that I and other researchers do not say that colonists and settlers didn't build any stone walls, they most certainly did but the style of construction is far different that the primitive stone walls found throughout this region in areas that are not conducive to farming or anything else maybe timber harvesting and even then these areas are difficult to work in.

Weighing on the evidence, one could reasonably conclude the New England stone wall system is the greatest engineering feat of pre history, and it is has been hidden in plain sight by a narrative that does not hold up to minor scrutiny.
It would be interesting if we could get a Native American elder to comment on them. I have only heard legends that these were built by the old people. IE a population that lived in the area prior to the Amerindians moving to the area.
I wouldn't call the stone wall primitive work, some of the feature in walls are very impressive and would be a challenge to create.
133908088_10100362755846860_1259906794234723476_n.jpeg

This wall on bedrock seems to be held up by one small stone at the very bottom.
138779923_10100366221436790_7454538099774698749_n.jpeg

Hard to understand why and how there is a boulder on top of the wall.
140025822_10100367601880370_8451948841211264190_n.jpeg

The walls work with the land and like the wall seen here have a flow to them while at the same time possible displaying effigy.
164335342_10100383065042070_7749132252253390680_n.jpeg

This photo was taken on the spring equinox on a wall that is aligned to the sunset, the rock on the far right side appears to be a turtle effigy. To create something this complex using the sun on a certain day, one can not be primitive.
155074010_10100378031863600_1395786458204849427_n.jpeg

The opposite side of the wall with the turtle effigy ends in a serpent effigy that is aligned to the winter solstice sunrise. Meaning that this wall has multiple alignments and effigy built into it. Knowledge of the sun cycles as well stone mason work needed to complete such a task is again complex.
173156752_10100387966205100_2079636629369809946_n.jpeg

Another example of a wall flowing with the landscape and the precise positioning of stones to create an image. This is a framed oval stone on bedrock.

Last fall I had a great conversation with a member of the Southern and Eastern Tribes. He said that in the 1980s people were starting to share the stone works. As the public started to learn about the sites they started to get vandalized by people seeking artifacts. So they stepped back from sharing in order to protect them. He said they know they are there but the best way to protect them is by leaving them alone, I agree with him this is why when I visit I only take alignments and photos. He also talked about stone stoves on mountains in Maine. When someone questioned why the stoves are way up on the mountain side he said that when the stove were built the land was much lower and it wasnt hard to reach the locations.
 

Maxresde

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This is Bill Vieira from 2011. Well ahead of the curve, but perhaps stuck in the Graham Hancock version of history.
A Mystery Explored: Who Built New England’s Stone Walls?

I highlighted some of the more pertinent to stolenhistory, and it is worth a full read.


The stone walls of New England. Local folklore states that every stone wall you see was built sometime in the last 400 years. This seems like a reasonable supposition at first glance. Colonials definitely built walls for property boundaries and agricultural uses. Timber eventually became scarce in the colonies and fencing was needed as land was farmed and livestock raised. We are told that the majority of the walls were built in a roughly 50-year window between the Revolutionary and Civil wars. How many walls did and does New England actually have?
A 1939 study done by an engineer using agricultural records estimated there were 240,000 miles of stone walls east of the Hudson River right after the Civil War. This very conservative estimate was done using incomplete data and didn't account for other areas in the Northeast that possess large numbers of stone walls.
The actual figure is well over 500,000 miles, many researchers estimate — equivalent to a stone wall that circles the earth 20 times or all the way to the moon and back. Does it seem likely that a colonial population struggling for survival, involved in several all-encompassing wars and working difficult and unforgiving land could have accomplished this feat? It would have been the most costly and labor-intensive undertaking in colonial history. The total sheer tonnage of New England stone walls represents an amount greater than all the world’s pyramids, stone temples, stone complexes and ancient stone structures combined.

An indication of the antiquity of many walls is their seemingly irrational construction and placement. If the reason for walls was for agricultural purposes and boundary markers, then a massive amount fall into some unknown realm. There are stone walls 12 feet high with 20 foot bases, walls that undulate wildly, tying into huge glacial erratics, beginning and ending without seeming purpose and defining no boundary; walls that are balanced with exact precision and have large holes throughout their entire length; walls with precise geometric shapes such as squares, triangles and rectangles embedded in them; walls that have the exact same strange building techniques used in Martha's Vineyard to Pennsylvania and all around New England including in Ashfield, Plainfield, Hawley and other surrounding towns.
There are walls that follow no property boundaries or deed lines; walls that enclose huge swamps, climbing up 30-foot cliffs, using precariously perched stones weighing 5,000 and 10,000 pounds apiece; walls that consist of quartz that geologists determined to be brought from miles away because the area in question possessed none; stones actually quarried and used in construction when there is ample stone in close proximity if the purpose was to clear land or build boundaries; quartz quarried and made into walls, walls that end abruptly with serpent and effigy heads, walls with massive amounts of stone cairns and effigy mounds next to them that have the same construction techniques; walls over mountains that were never settled or farmed; walls that head straight up mountains built on such extreme slopes that your lungs burn just to walk them — many, many walls that use countless stones weighing several tons in totally inaccessible areas that could not have been made without the benefit of beasts of burden.
All this is backed up with colonial reports of walls existing when they arrived here and old records referring to Indian stone fences or walls that existed before colonials.


This playlist also covers the topic. Not the best presentation, but worthy of a mention.

View: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdUyWiIu8Ft70bOsB43cY7ZJMHJiJH5Mp


In this series of videos I dismantle the mainstream academic history on the stone walls of New York and New England. Remember that I and other researchers do not say that colonists and settlers didn't build any stone walls, they most certainly did but the style of construction is far different that the primitive stone walls found throughout this region in areas that are not conducive to farming or anything else maybe timber harvesting and even then these areas are difficult to work in.

Weighing on the evidence, one could reasonably conclude the New England stone wall system is the greatest engineering feat of pre history, and it is has been hidden in plain sight by a narrative that does not hold up to minor scrutiny.
It would be interesting if we could get a Native American elder to comment on them. I have only heard legends that these were built by the old people. IE a population that lived in the area prior to the Amerindians moving to the area.

I agree with this. I have heard the same thing about how many miles of stone walls there are, etc.

It is true. Particularly in the fall it becomes easier to see these stone walls. They go up the sides of hills, and are in all kinds of odd spots that don't make sense for any kind of agricultural purpose.

There is a stone wall near a stone chamber in central Mass. and it literally runs into a river. I can't remember which town it was in. But I said at the time, 'Who builds a stone wall in a river?' It did not appear that the river's course had changed substantially enough that the wall would have been above the river at any time as far as I could see.

But, I can say that if you try to plow or do any kind of digging in most of New England, you are going to do nothing but move rocks. There are a lot of places where you can't stick a spoon in the dirt without hitting a rock.

Dry stone structures like these are supposed to be impossible to date. I would not be surprised if these walls might have accumulated over a very long period of time. Even now, people rarely go out and move a stone wall unless they are building something.

If someone had built a section of one of these walls 2,000 years ago, it would probably still be sitting there without much change. The soil is very thin in a lot of New England, so it would not necessarily get covered up as time went by.

Those authors I mentioned above, Gage, write in one of their books that the Indians were accustomed to making stone markers at burial sites, and it was supposed to be a sign of respect to add another rock if you passed by one of these markers.
 

BStankman

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Calling the stone walls primitive was Budcat7's words, not mine.
The skill level for these walls runs from experienced stone mason to rudimentary.
With the majority I have encountered rather simple. Requiring brute strength and around the same level of training you could give to a young boy to stack wood. It is a skill that improves quickly through experience.

I am indecisive on the effigies. With 500,000 miles to pick from, mere random chance could result in pareidolia and perfect alignments.
But I do submit people doing intense manual labor will sometimes do things to make the task less mindless and tedious.
The images Magnus presents are definitely not pareidolia. It is confirmation New England is the land of the Turtle just as the natives said. And suggests the culture there was not as primitive as we have been told. Or they had fallen from a more advanced culture by 1620. Or a more advanced culture had been replaced through migration in another "tartar invasion" story that repeats through history.



magnus_7.jpg

I really want to call into question this 10,000 year date. What are the real chances these dams could have survived a one in a thousand year flood ten times? The New England freeze thaw cycle is brutal. It creates potholes and sinkholes.
And burrowing rodents live in and under these walls.
 
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