Supercomputer simulation re-enacts the birth of the Moon

Timeshifter

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I would have liked to post this in the Sarcastic discoveries sub forum, but it doesn't seem to have been brought back?

Anyway, if this is what still passes for science, is there any wonder the world sleepwalks through life?

This whole article in short.

If I give a computer a scenario with set parameters it will tell me what I want it to tell me...

'The formation of the Moon billions of years ago is cloaked in mystery. Most astronomers believe the young Earth, still cooling off from its formation, was struck by a mars-sized body called Theia, roughly 4.5 billion years ago.
As the proto-Moon orbited Earth, it cooled, and gathered debris from the surrounding region of space. At the time, the Moon was much closer to Earth than it is today. Over billions of years, gravitational forces between the Earth and the Moon resulted in our planetary companion moving further away from our home world'

Got to ensure that we pre programme the facts 1st...

'Interestingly, when simulations tested the effect of a non-spinning version of Theia, the impact resulted in a satellite with roughly 80 percent of the mass of the Moon. Adding just a small amount of spin resulted in a second Moon in orbit around Earth.

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A screenshot of one of the simulations....

'Some of the impacts studied resulted in merging of the early Earth and Theia, while others showed just a glancing blow between the bodies.

“Among the resulting debris disc in some impacts, we find a self-gravitating clump of material. It is roughly the mass of the Moon, contains [about one percent] iron like the Moon… The clump contains mainly impactor material near its core but becomes increasingly enriched in proto-Earth material near its surface,” researchers describe in an article describing the study, published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.'

Source
 

kd-755

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“Among the resulting debris disc in some impacts, we find a self-gravitating clump of material. It is roughly the mass of the Moon, contains [about one percent] iron like the Moon… The clump contains mainly impactor material near its core but becomes increasingly enriched in proto-Earth material near its surface,”
Good grief. Talk about flannelling the client!
 

Bitbybit

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I am sceptical to the collision theory.
Since the the suns gravity towards earth is thought of like a ball in a friction less "coin well" like this:
View: https://youtu.be/XTipCQxJ6Ak

I cant see how two colliding balls (roughly the same size) wouldnt end up in the middle pit after a few more laps.

To somehow make the original ball continue in its circular path after such collision seems at least very unlikely.
 
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